Mausers on the shelf?

Discussion in 'Curio & Relic Zone' started by Dane, Apr 30, 2018.

  1. Dane

    Dane Supporting Member

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    Recent pawn shop visit I noticed two rifles in the case labeled as Mauser.

    Maybe?? I am no expert. Says they are model 1895. That the year of manufacture?? See picture.
     
    Last edited: Apr 30, 2018
  2. Dane

    Dane Supporting Member

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    0B77486A-3E15-4806-946E-0EDEC3272DAA.jpeg
     
    Last edited: Apr 30, 2018

  3. OldOutlaw

    OldOutlaw Supporting Member

    I do see 2 of them.
     
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  4. Dagwood

    Dagwood Supporting Member

    There was a model 1893, and 1895. That does not necessarily mean they were mfg that year. The next model I believe was the 1897. The model 1898 is considered by many to be the quintessential Mauser. Many high end bolt action hunting rifles are still built off of the 98 action to this day. I am by no means an expert, but I did stay in a Holiday Inn Express last night...
     
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  5. Dane

    Dane Supporting Member

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    I have heard of the 98 action! Had no idea what that meant.
     
  6. ajole

    ajole Supporting Member

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    Mausers went through some design changes, the 1889 in 7.65X53 was sold to Turkey as the 1890, the same thing known as the 1891 was sold to Belgium and Argentina,, then an 8X57 was sold to Turkey. I have an Argentine that was rebarreled to 7.62X39.

    The 1893 was sold to Spain, it was cock on closing, 7X57, and made in Germany at first. I have one.

    The 1895 has a slightly modified round bolt face and mag follower that allows you to close the bolt with no bullets in the mag, and was sold to Chile, and to the Transvaal Orange Free State, those are often called the Boer rifles. Also 7X57. I have a Chilean.

    The 1898 was next, called the Gewehr 98 or G98. Several versions are around, it was 8X57, but a less powerful version than used later. There are MANY types, Turkish, Commission, commercial, and others. It had a third locking lug, the famous controlled feed extractor, and gas relief ports, plus a two stage trigger.

    That became the shorter K98a, K98b, and the K98k of WW2 fame.

    Versions were made in Czechoslovakia by BRNO, Poland, Spain and in Yugoslavia after WW2, and by FN before and after WW2 as well, plus in Turkey, almost all in 8X57.

    I have a pre-war Czech, a post war Yugo, a Russian capture K98k, a 1944 K. Kale Turk, all in 8X57, and a Spanish FR8 in .308.
     
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  7. And here I was thinking Ajole was only Mister .22 rifle.
    Shame on me. :D
     
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  8. ajole

    ajole Supporting Member

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    The one's in the picture...Look like both are 1895's? One says 7.62 NATO? Those were made by reaming out a large hole, inserting a hunk of metal that was soldered in, and re-chambered. They are relatively safe, but "may" be questionable.

    Check here for more info....http://castboolits.gunloads.com/sho...-Modelo-Chileno-1895-7-62x51-Nato-conversions


    I started with Milsurps, when they got too expensive and hard to find, I went to the .22's.:cheers:
     
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  9. welderman

    welderman Member

    Years ago, when I was still working and the price was a little easier to swallow, I planned on getting a K98 from Mitchell's. Then the tumor was found and workability ceased so no Mauser for welderman. I still drool a little when I see them. But I would have to square it with SHMBO! Sooooo, I'll wait till I win the lottery. :rolleyes:
    BTW good to have someone here with the knowledge ajole, thanks for the history lesson. I always love to learn this stuff.
     
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  10. ajole

    ajole Supporting Member

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    The K98 tends to run high dollar, but the other Mausers are really just as good, and any from pre 1945 in Europe are just as likely to have been used in a war. For a while, the 24/47 was cheap, they were made by FN, or later in Yugoslavia, as the model 24, then upgraded a bit after the war, thus the /47 part. But even those aren’t cheap anymore, maybe $350 at the bottom end? South American guns tend to be a little cheaper, but they aren’t always in the best condition. For a while, Turks were the Mosin of Mausers, they were everywhere at $110, but no longer.

    Sometimes you can find a decent priced sporterized gun that was not molested too badly, they just cut the wood down, and put a scope on it. But it’s just not the same.:(
     
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