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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Air gun Trigger Rectangle Line Gun barrel
Air gun Wood Trigger Gun barrel Gun accessory

I'm just about finished bringing this gun back from the dead. I'm waiting for a new set of Wolfe Springs as they are caught up in the USPS log jam along with everyone's Christmas presents.

I plan to put a SeeAll open sight on the rail as soon as everything is reassembled and working.

The gun is stainless steel so there is no finish work to do. I think being stainless is what kept it from warping in the fire.

Much of the crud on the gun was from other items that burned and deposited their remains on this gun.

I think I will have a nice shooter for the grandkids to enjoy with me. I'm thinking about shooting squirrels too.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
It is. The seller included a letter about the forest fire that burned the cabin this gun was in. It was the "Beachie Creek Fire near Lyons, OR. It seems there were over 200 guns in lost in this cabin fire. Five people died, but I don't think he meant those people died in this cabin.

The fire got hot enough to melt the front and rear sights that were likely an aluminum alloy. This gun wasn't in a safe, but some were. Those in the safe faired a little better.

I used a very fine blast media to get most of the oxidized material of the surface. The insides were in great shape except for the springs.

Now the question is, how will it hold up to standard veocity .22 ammo? The good news is internal parts are still available, so unless the frame cracks, I should be good to go.
 

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Its a 22. I seriously doubt it will explode if you shoot high velocity ammo. The pressures are not great enough to hurt it.
 

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The fire got hot enough to melt the front and rear sights that were likely an aluminum alloy. <snip> I used a very fine blast media to get most of the oxidized material of the surface. The insides were in great shape except for the springs.
An amazing restoration!
 
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Beautiful work on restoration. I have a normal, late 1950's High Standard model 103 I inherited from my Granddad.

Don't know how much stronger the stainless models are, but I know in the plain steel models, the weak point is at the right rear portion of frame where the ejection cutout is. It's been said numerous times from owners of these guns that the frame will crack in this area if anybody uses high velocity ammos. Probably from the harder recoils from pounding the recoil spring will have is why it cracks the frame. Remember, a lot of these models of guns came out before many manufacturer's of high velocity ammos came out.

Are you getting the mini SeeAll? It should look so natural on this type of gun.
 

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Good work! Are you sure you didn't stick a factory original in there on us!

JK. I looks good!
 
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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
Font Bumper Material property Carbon Office equipment
Beautiful work on restoration. I have a normal, late 1950's High Standard model 103 I inherited from my Granddad.

Don't know how much stronger the stainless models are, but I know in the plain steel models, the weak point is at the right rear portion of frame where the ejection cutout is. It's been said numerous times from owners of these guns that the frame will crack in this area if anybody uses high velocity ammos. Probably from the harder recoils from pounding the recoil spring will have is why it cracks the frame. Remember, a lot of these models of guns came out before many manufacturer's of high velocity ammos came out.

Are you getting the mini SeeAll? It should look so natural on this type of gun.
I want the micro that uses two screws to anchor the sight. I don't like the rail clamp version with the the large bolt sticking out the side.
 

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View attachment 69779
I want the micro that uses two screws to anchor the sight. I don't like the rail clamp version with the the large bolt sticking out the side.
I got that micro in the tritium version, and the larger Mark 2 without the side nut, for just about $120 total during the sales a bit back.
Just like in the stock photo.

 

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It is. The seller included a letter about the forest fire that burned the cabin this gun was in. It was the "Beachie Creek Fire near Lyons, OR. It seems there were over 200 guns in lost in this cabin fire. Five people died, but I don't think he meant those people died in this cabin.

The fire got hot enough to melt the front and rear sights that were likely an aluminum alloy. This gun wasn't in a safe, but some were. Those in the safe faired a little better.

I used a very fine blast media to get most of the oxidized material of the surface. The insides were in great shape except for the springs.

Now the question is, how will it hold up to standard veocity .22 ammo? The good news is internal parts are still available, so unless the frame cracks, I should be good to go.
THAT is a damn good restoration job. Nicely done!!
 
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