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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
One of my daughters is 9yo and needs to do a science project. At 9yo she is hardly capable of completing a report let alone a project. And the teacher made it mandatory that the parents have to help but not do the project (like that's going to happen). I hated science projects when I was in school and I sure as heck don't want to do another one but I have to.

I need suggestions for a project that a 9 yo can understand and I can help her with and complete in only a few days.

Any Suggestions?

(No volcanoes, animals, or Tesla Coils)
 

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Sprouting seeds/germination before planting.
different environments/watering cycles... show the differences.

9V battery, copper wire, and a nail... instant electromagnet... how to make it more powerful... etc.
 

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grow grass on a sponge!
 

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Since the fall color change is coming why not do something like this. It's from an old lesson plan, kids seemed to enjoy it.

Separate colors in a green leaf using Chromatography

Supplies:
leaves, small glass jars (jelly, baby food)
lids for jars, aluminum foil works in a pinch.
rubbing alcohol
coffee filters
baking pan
hot tap water
tape
pencil/pen
plastic knife or spoon
clock

What you do:

Collect 2-3 large leaves from several different trees. Tear or chop the leaves into very small pieces and put them into small jars labeled with the name or location of the tree.

Add enough rubbing alcohol to each jar to cover the leaves. Using a plastic knife or spoon, carefully chop and grind the leaves in the alcohol.

Cover the jars very loosely with lids or aluminum foil. Place the jars carefully into a shallow tray containing 1 inch of hot tap water.

Keep the jars in the water for at least a half-hour, longer if needed, until the alcohol has become colored (the darker the better). Twirl each jar gently about every five minutes. Replace the hot water if it cools off.

Cut a long thin strip of coffee filter paper for each of the jars and label it.

Remove jars from water and uncover. Place a strip of filter paper into each jar so that one end is in the alcohol. Bend the other end over the top of the jar and secure it with tape.

The alcohol will travel up the paper, bringing the colors with it. After 30-90 minutes (or longer), the colors will travel different distances up the paper as the alcohol evaporates. You should be able to see different shades of green, and possibly some yellow, orange or red, depending on the type of leaf.

Remove the strips of paper, let them dry and then tape them to a piece of plain paper.

It's pretty quick and simple, plus the kid'll enjoy it and will have a better understanding of why/how leaves change in the fall.
 

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Forget what I said, that leaf thing is much cooler, and will probably get your kid big +'s with the teach.
 

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one i did when was a kid is easy.build a little volcano on a platform of somekind have proxide and baken soda when its time put the baken soda in first then pour in some proxide then it starts foaming out.not dangerous or posiones.
 

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one i did when was a kid is easy.build a little volcano on a platform of somekind have proxide and baken soda when its time put the baken soda in first then pour in some proxide then it starts foaming out.not dangerous or posiones.
Read the last line in the OP's post... Don't skim through a post if you're going to respond... It always happens.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Since the fall color change is coming why not do something like this. It's from an old lesson plan, kids seemed to enjoy it.

Separate colors in a green leaf using Chromatography
I have brought this one to the wiff's attention and we might go with this one. I just need to figure out why it works... and as per the suggestion by Maaso... how to blow it up!! LOL!!!
 

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I have brought this one to the wiff's attention and we might go with this one. I just need to figure out why it works... and as per the suggestion by Maaso... how to blow it up!! LOL!!!
When you tear the leaves up you break the cells, that releases the "color" the alcohol in a warm water bath helps to draw out more of the pigment and makes the color flow up the coffee filters easier.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I have brought this one to the wiff's attention and we might go with this one. I just need to figure out why it works... and as per the suggestion by Maaso... how to blow it up!! LOL!!!
When you tear the leaves up you break the cells, that releases the "color" the alcohol in a warm water bath helps to draw out more of the pigment and makes the color flow up the coffee filters easier.
Thanks for the idea. We are going to use it. I did a search and found this site to help with the report end of it;

http://www.sciencemadesimple.com/leaves.html
 

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Excellent, that is a good general explanation of what goes on inside the leaf's chemical structure. Hope the little one gets a big blue ribbon, and some memories of working with pops!
 

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That's what I'm talking about! Good one leadslinger!
 

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noone said potato cannon?i did that one year,cut it in half lengthwise[so i could take it to school]
what fuel worked the best,ect.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
WOO HOO!!!

I got an A+ on my daughter's science project!! lol!!

We did a study called "The Great American Grilled Cheese Sandwich" that determined which cheese was the best for making a grilled cheese sammich. Yea, it was pretty lame.

American Cheese from the Deli turned out the best. (like I didn't already know that)

 
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