new 995ts eating my brass

Discussion in 'Hi-Point Carbines' started by OGNerdy, Dec 23, 2015.

  1. OGNerdy

    OGNerdy Member

    3
    0
    Just picked up a new 995 and after the first mag i noticed every spent shell has a little nick in it like its catching on something when its being chambered seems to run smoothly, is this the reason ppl polish the feed ramp? I was hoping to give the spent brass to my father in law so he could reload it but this gun is chewing it up. is this part of the normal break in? :wah:
     
  2. Dagwood

    Dagwood Supporting Member

    Welcome from the Great Southwest!
    I wouldn't polish the feed ramp. I would just shoot it and see what happens. The feed ramp issues are usually related to the C9, not the 995ts. The carbines are awesome! How many rds have you put thru it?
     

  3. OGNerdy

    OGNerdy Member

    3
    0
  4. hp995tsfg

    hp995tsfg Member

    If you are getting a little nick at the case mouth of the brass, this might be by design. Mine puts two little nicks on the case.. Debb (HP) did this to help LEO track guns used in crimes. During case resizing it should smooth right out. YMMV
     
  5. OGNerdy

    OGNerdy Member

    3
    0
    yep its at the mouth,one more question does your firing pin hit dead center or a little off?
     
  6. FlashBang

    FlashBang I Stand With Talon Lifetime Supporter

    The small nicks are caused by the spent case hitting the ejection port. It can be also be caused by the extractor dragging the case on the breach face if the tension is to loose. This issue commonly happens in a new firearm when the recoil spring is not broken in yet or still at its strongest.

    Load a magazine, then take a black sharpie and draw a line on the top round from the rim to the case mouth edge. After the round is fired you can look at the case and it will enable you to tell if it is hitting on the right, left, top or bottom during the ejection cycle. The location will help identify if it is extractor tension or recoil spring related. ;)

    .
     
  7. FlashBang

    FlashBang I Stand With Talon Lifetime Supporter

    I'd be interested to see the documentation of this. I have a few of the carbines and none of them do this.

    .
     
  8. greg_r

    greg_r Lifetime Supporter

    8,912
    6,412
    I remember reading an article about Deebs and Hi Point that said basically the same thing, that Deebs did little things with his firearms to help police identify them. IIRC they talked about special marks.
     
  9. "...Deeb called his guns “Cadillac of sh1t guns.” He acknowledges that, as he calls them, “yahoos” buy his guns mainly because they are cheap."

    I'm proud to be one of the yahoos who shoots cadillac sh!t guns. :p
     
  10. SWAGA

    SWAGA No longer broke... Lifetime Supporter

    Nice........:cool:
     
  11. "...Deeb called his guns “Cadillac of sh1t guns.” He acknowledges that, as he calls them, “yahoos” buy his guns mainly because they are cheap."

    Deeb forgot to add that he provides one of the best firearm warranties in the gun biz.
    I'm proud to be one of the yahoos who shoots cadillac sh!t guns. :p
     
  12. undeRGRound

    undeRGRound ROLL wif Da MOLE! Supporting Member

    25,121
    1,380
    INDY
    :welcome:OGNerd! Hope you stick around,
    Welcome to the "Nut Hut" :D

     
  13. FlashBang

    FlashBang I Stand With Talon Lifetime Supporter

    The Hi-Point rifling has unique striations that identify the bullet as having been fired from an HP, additionally the HP's leave a unique breech mark on the cartridge casing that aides in identifying the weapon that fired it.

    The HP's also have a hidden serial number plate embedded into them during the casting to provide identification even if the serial number is ground off the receiver.

    Rifling identification is common to all weapons, breech marking is found in the majority of weapons, and the embedded serial number plate (to my knowledge) is unique to the HP family of weapons.

    Typically in forensic identification the rifling, breech mark and firing pin strike imprint are used to match a casing to the fired cartridge and/or bullet.

    The HP's however are not designed to purposefully place nicks in the case mouth
    . One reason is that case mouths can be nicked from too many other sources both before and after firing, and a second reason is due to liability issues if the case is reloaded.

    The link you pointed to itself only states:
    "Hi-Point is the only manufacturer that makes very unique rifling marks in the barrel of the weapon."

    .
     
  14. TNTRAILERTRASH

    TNTRAILERTRASH Supporting Member

    Nope. You have a problem.
     
  15. ndindy

    ndindy Member

    154
    2
    A picture would be handy, it might be a problem, might not. Lots of semi autos ding a neck sometimes but rarely bad enough to cause issues even while reloading.
     
  16. ndindy

    ndindy Member

    154
    2
    Well, he has 2 options. 1. Be honest or 2. lie about how they're the best or at least comparable to the best.