New edition

Discussion in 'Hi-Point Pistols' started by histed, Jun 20, 2014.

  1. histed

    histed Supporting Member

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    Well, it finally happened. This spring my wife finally decided it was time for her to have a "house gun." She has shot, but isn't a shooter, if you get my meaning, so we went to the range and shot everything I could get my hands on. .38 snubbies (2), Model 19 .357, Bersa 9mm, SCCY 9mm, Glock 17 and HP in both .380 and 9. Yeah, she picked the HP C9. AND she put her first 5 from that (borrowed) gun inside the 8 ring at 15 yards! "I like this. It doesn't kick and it shoots well."

    So, today she became the proud owner of a brand new C9. I've read that the break in period is between 100 and 150 rounds. Any comments? I also see that a lot of you reload, as do I. Any problem shooting reloads for break-in? I already slugged the barrel, so I know my current cast load should work without leading. Next stop, a .45 for me.
     
  2. Bull

    Bull Just a Man Supporting Member

    Welcome to the forum! ive only put about 4-500 rds through mine, never really had many problems with it. Glad the missus likes it.
     

  3. Benjamin

    Benjamin Member

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    Tell the wife it need to be broken and she should be the one to do it. maby get some traning at the same time.
     
  4. histed

    histed Supporting Member

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    That's the plan, Ben. Safety first, then sight alignment, grip.... No substitute for trigger time. I'm just wanting to know if there's anything different with the HP. Thanks for the replys
     
  5. Bull

    Bull Just a Man Supporting Member


    Nothing odd about it... Just keep a good grip on it, as limp wristing will cause feeding/ejection problems.
     
  6. Rachgier

    Rachgier Administrator Staff Member

    +1 to this...

    And I'll add to it by saying the safety can feel a bit weird at first so practice makes perfect, and to learn how to feel the trigger. For me the HP trigger was a bit rough, but it smoothed out with use. I'm upwards of a couple of thousand rounds through my carbine.
     
  7. Hipointer

    Hipointer Member

    Very cool! I have two C9's, and even though most people laugh at them, after they shoot them they don't laugh about the performance. For the price point of the Hi Point products, you can't, in no way, find a better value...period.
     
  8. histed

    histed Supporting Member

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    What's to laugh at? We finally got to the range today and she put 50 rounds through her C9. Was one other guy there shooting a pair of Glocks who was very helpful - and VERY encouraging to my wife! All of her shots were in the 8 or better at 5, 10 and 15 yards. Slow fire- nothing fancy at this point. We are having a problem with the mag. If we load 8, the first one up tends to nose-dive instead of feeding when the slide is released. I tried the search engine for mag modifications, as I've seen references to this, but can't find the thread that explains what to do. Be grateful for the link. The other problem is, I THINK, her limp wristing the pistol at times. About round 6 or 7 the empty will eject, but the striker won't reset. Once the slide is racked, the pistol works fine. Anyway, just wanted you to know there is another firm believer in the ranks - my wife!

    BTW, to any of the ladies on the forum, what method do you find works best for working the slide? It should loosen up with use, but we had a few minor problems in that respect today. Any suggestions are welcome (I was teaching her the "push-pull" method, if that helps)
    Thanks again
     
  9. cicpup

    cicpup Resident PITA Supporting Member

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    Simple pimple. First off leave the mag loaded when not in use and occasionally unload and reload it. This will help break in the spring. Secondly, when racking that first round, do it with authority. Pull the slide back fully and let it fly slingshot style. If these two don't solve the problem then you might need to tweak the front feed lips. Rule of thumb, if round is nose down bend the lips outward. Nose up = inward. Just a little at a time testing between tweaks. It's a trial & error thing so be patient, but once you have it just right it'll feed like a champ.
     
  10. gasman42

    gasman42 Member

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    The safety is a piece of crap. For a house weapon.. A double action piece for a woman makes me feel a little better.
    No safety no nothing point and shoot bang bang.. Makes the best sense to me in a home defense situation.. Just my OP
    And not trying to start a flame off.. Just a very simple user friendly revolver will get it done..
     
  11. histed

    histed Supporting Member

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    cicpup - S'what I was looking for. Much thanks.
    gasman - no offense taken. We tried that route, as I originally posted. She doesn't like revolvers, at least none that she shot so far. I do understand your point, one I've made myself at times. However, after reading The Cornered Cat blog, I took Pax's advice. So far she's happy and secure with her C9. ;)
     
  12. histed

    histed Supporting Member

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    OOP! Must have posed this twice
     
  13. TRWXXA

    TRWXXA Member

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    Make sure to teach your gal not to baby the gun. The push-pull is good, but skip any of that stuff about "60/40". Think more like "100/100". We're talking about pure defensive pistol here. She should grip it tight - tight enough her hands just start to shake, then back it off a hair.

    When racking the slide DO NOT think slingshot. None of this dainty thumb and forefinger stuff. Here is a decent demonstration:
    www.youtube.com/watch?v=kbayNc6D9HY
    However, in a defensive situation she would not hold the slide back. When the slide hits the rear stop, it should be allowed to pop out of support hand as the strong side hand keeps thrusting the gun forward towards the target. The plastic sights on the HP won't hurt her hand. I hate the typical, "Women should get revolvers because they are too weak to cycle the action of a pistol" bulls***. Most woment can, they are just not taught right. If my arthritic, 70 year old mother can operate my HK USP40C, a woman can find a gun they can manipulate.

    Yes, the safety can be a PITA. She just has to make its operation part of the muscle memory. Saftey comes off as the gun comes up on target. Safety goes on when the gun comes back to the ready position.
     
  14. Bull

    Bull Just a Man Supporting Member

    I'd add that if you're carrying empty chamber, the safety has no bearing in a self defense scenario.
     
  15. cicpup

    cicpup Resident PITA Supporting Member

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    "Slingshot" as in pull it back and let it fly. Not as in holding it like a freakin' mo.
     
  16. Bull

    Bull Just a Man Supporting Member

    Lol..... Bout pissed myself on that one.....
     
  17. histed

    histed Supporting Member

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    TRWXX - thanks for the vid link. Now I know what I did wrong and how to fix it. She liked it (and a couple of others) also.
    Exactly what my better half said - has to be second nature in a high stress. What is really cool is that SHE is now asking ME if we can go shooting!! I need a progressive loader!
     
  18. Congrats and welcome to the forum
     
  19. TRWXXA

    TRWXXA Member

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    Funny...
    But when you say "slingshot" that is what comes to people's minds. It's what you say, not what you mean, that counts. When training or teaching you have to choose your words carefully, especially when there are no images involved. The recipient of the message will generate their own images, and those will be based on their own knowledge and experience.

    So you say, "slingshot", and unless you can demonstrate or show the technique you are talking about, most folks are going to have images of firing a Wrist-Rocket in their head. This will be reinforced by all, the bad technique they have probably already seen in the movies, on TV and YouTube, and at their local shooting range.
     

  20. +1 words and their definitions matter.