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I have not purchased a handgun yet, but will soon. I had been considering 9 mm. , .38 or .40 cal. weapon. Mostly for defense, and only occasional plinking and target shooting. I would be carrying while motorcycling on trips and bike camping.

9 mm ammo seems to be much more affordable , but that is not as important to me as reliability and stopping power in an emergency. how is the recoil going to differ between these choices.
thanx
 

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I have not purchased a handgun yet, but will soon. I had been considering 9 mm. , .38 or .40 cal. weapon. Mostly for defense, and only occasional plinking and target shooting. I would be carrying while motorcycling on trips and bike camping.

9 mm ammo seems to be much more affordable , but that is not as important to me as reliability and stopping power in an emergency. how is the recoil going to differ between these choices.
thanx
I vote 9mm. then again I'm cheap.
 

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9mm and .38 can be rather snappy with a light weight framed pistol/revolver depending on the ammo. .40S&W is more of a push than a snap, but some people don't like it as they say it's a "wrist breaker". It really depends on how much you intend to shoot, your size/weight and medical conditions such as arthritis or any other chronic pain. Most people find that .38 is a great gun caliber to start with when going with a revolver and 9mm if you want a semi automatic.
 

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I can speak for 9mm and .38 from experience and say they're both low kick. The .38 will put up more of a fight in your hand, but both are very user-friendly rounds. Stopping power...well, what do you want to stop? Many sources make note that the 9mm round has very similiar characteristics to larger rounds and can inflict similar damage. 9mm is *generally* the best all-around caliber and you can afford to shoot it in bulk at the range.
 

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Mostly for defense, and only occasional plinking and target shooting.
Self defense could be much more difficult if you don't practice shooting enough. Range time is very important. It helps you to be more comfortable with your pistol, and it will improve your accuracy greatly.

Oh, :welcome:
 

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Shot placement is paramount to caliber size. A .22lr to the heart is better than a .45 to the arm. I vote for 9mm. It is a manageable round.
+1

Buy only what you are comfortable with, head out to an indoor range and rent several and shoot several calibers to see what works best for you
 

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... I had been considering 9 mm. , .38 or .40 cal. weapon...
Yes, do so. Then be sure to get a .22 for cheap practice. And everyone needs a .45; after that you must play around with .44. Somewhere you'll come across something in a weird caliber you'll just have to try (like a Nagant or a Webley), just give in and buy it.
 

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Shot placement is paramount to caliber size. A .22lr to the heart is better than a .45 to the arm. I vote for 9mm. It is a manageable round.
I hear more people are killed with a 22 than any other caliber ?? or was that Doctor's ?

With a little practice you could place all 10 rounds to the head of the BG with a 22.

If it's me I'd go with a S&W 686 with a 4 inch barrel. It's a 357 but you can still shoot 38 rounds for range fun. It's a six shooter and will never fail for HD or out in the woods with magnum ammo. Only problem is used one's go for around $400.
 

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Shot placement is paramount to caliber size. A .22lr to the heart is better than a .45 to the arm. I vote for 9mm. It is a manageable round.
I hear more people are killed with a 22 than any or caliber ?? or was that Doctor's ?

With a little practice you could place all 10 rounds to the head of the BG with a 22.

If it' me I'd go with a S&W 686 with a 4 inch barrel. It's a 357 but you can still shoot 38 rounds for range fun. It's a six shooter and will never fail for HD or out in the woods with magnum ammo. Only problem is used one's go for around $400.
My uncle has that gun. I never got to shoot it but Ive held it before and even tried getting him to sell it to me. He wont sell it.
 

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Shot placement is paramount to caliber size. A .22lr to the heart is better than a .45 to the arm. I vote for 9mm. It is a manageable round.
I hear more people are killed with a 22 than any other caliber ?? or was that Doctor's ?

With a little practice you could place all 10 rounds to the head of the BG with a 22.

If it's me I'd go with a S&W 686 with a 4 inch barrel. It's a 357 but you can still shoot 38 rounds for range fun. It's a six shooter and will never fail for HD or out in the woods with magnum ammo. Only problem is used one's go for around $400.
But if your going with a Hi Point then the C9 could be a good choice, price and ammo wise. I figure that since you posted on the Hi Point site.
 

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If it's me I'd go with a S&W 686 with a 4 inch barrel. It's a 357 but you can still shoot 38 rounds for range fun. It's a six shooter and will never fail for HD or out in the woods with magnum ammo. Only problem is used one's go for around $400.
great choice, but never say never. Revolvers can break, but are less likely to do so than a semi
 

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But it never has never failed to fire, never, like never last week, never last month, never last year, never in the 90's and never in the 80's. So if it does never ever FAIL I'll make sure I never- never tell, never :D
 

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I bought a JHP last month, have only fired abouth 50 rds thru it. Had problems with the Wolf steel case ammo not feeding properly. Reloaded some lead 200g rnfp and some 200g rn, all of which loaded and fired flawlessly. Bought some PMC brass/fmj to help keep the barrel clean.

Then this month I bought a c9. I have shot about 20 rds through it, no problems at all, commercial or reloads. I like both pistols and combined have $!69 + $159 plus tax in them. Less than any of the higher brands for one.

Now I am waiting for my 995 to arrive. I have been on a shooting lull for about ten years, and when a friend told me about the Hi-Points, I had to check it out. Now I will have to be careful and not break the bank!
(I don't have a signature yet, working on it)
 

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I have a 9mm taurus revolver that I use for plinking and a range gun(along with my HP's) and I do CC withit somtimes, but I prefer to CC my PT140 :welcome:
 

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What caliber depends on shot placement, I would agree. I like a 9mm myself, but my carry gun is a Springfield with a magazine that hold 16 rounds, if I can't stop a bad guy with that, I'm not as good a shooter as i believe I am. And my practice targets show differently.

I've got friends who swear by the 10mm round, I also have other friends who say if you're not shooting magnums, a .357 minimum, you are wasting your time. I saw earlier posts about 10 in the head with a .22, I have to believe that is the talk of an extremely confident person. Yes, 10 rounds placed properly out of a .22 will drop the bad guy, it might just make him real mad and give him a bad headache (and a lot of anger from rounds whistling by his head).

My advice is just like an earlier post, go to a indoor range, and try a variety of calibers out, see what feels good in your hands, and what recoil you can take on a consistent basis firing. Choose based on that factor, buy a weapon that you prefer, and shoot the hell out of it practicing to hit consistently in the center ring as much as possible. Be prepared to spend a little cash for ammo to get consistent, and stay proficient in hitting where you want the round to go. Then spend a lot more money to buy ammo and shoot the hell out of it again, as often as possible. And,welcome my blood brother to a sport that is going to cost you more cash than you'll ever imagine, but you're gonna enjoy the hell out of it. It's a vicious cycle, buy ammo, shoot it up, buy ammo, shoot it up, repeat as often as possible.

If you are a new shooter, find a place you feel comfortable, and ask about trainers they have, spend a few bucks for a couple of hours of training, most instructors have several firearms, ask them to bring what they have to use. I have better than 35 years shooting and I still seek instruction from professionals in the sport, you can never learn enough to be the BEST, but you can sure as hell learn enough to do well. And more than enough to save your life in an emergency.
 
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I myself just asked this question not to long ago. I went with the c9 and am glad i did. Its easy to shoot, and what the other guys said accuracy is more important. I have never had a pistol before and my shooting skills stink with one, but with the 9 i have gone to the range so many times and have gotten pretty good without spending lots of money. If i needed to i can stop a BG, before probally not. I would go with the nine first, if you dont feel its enough(it is)you can drop another 150 bucks and go bigger. If you have not really shot pistols before dont go to big to fast. start small, i had to and its paying off.
 

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Self defense could be much more difficult if you don't practice shooting enough. Range time is very important. It helps you to be more comfortable with your pistol, and it will improve your accuracy greatly.
Oh, :welcome:
Here here... Except for the dead of winter when snow gets so deep I have to shovel out the targets, I put a 100 rounds down range every weekend. Also... I pull the trigger with the safety on... I pull the trigger with one in the chamber with the clip out... I do all of the things that test the pistol, and the mechanisms... if you shoot and handle your HP enough, you will be confortable.

If you are concerned carrying in condition 1 (And that is normal) consider adding to you collection a DA .357 revolver. you can find them for around the same price as a HP, and you can carry with the hammer on an empty chamber. They the stiff trigger pull gives you some more safety.

If this is your first weapon, you will soon find that the thought of saving change, returning bottles and doing odd jobs to buy a second is NOT going to be a stretch of the imagination :)

Leroy
 

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Look at Taurus's mod 605 .357 with a 2" barrel. If you shop around you can find one for about 350.00. With .38 loads, even the plus +p's it will group under 2" out to 25 yrds. Not as good with full trottled .357 loads, but still good. Oh yeah hang on with the .357 loads, there not a lot of fun to shoot after a few rounds.
 
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