Nickel VS. Brass

Discussion in 'Vintage Topic Archive (Sept - 2009)' started by Super_Virgil, Mar 15, 2008.

  1. Ok what is the diff. Why do reloaders prefer brass over nickel cases??? This may be a dumb question, but no one i know reloads, so I have to ask here.
     
  2. Strangerous

    Strangerous Member

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    OK.
    First off, It's nickel plated cases. The nickel plated cases are made to resist oxidation, and be nicer looking. They perform about the same as brass. However some folks have found that nickel nickle plated cases are only good for a few number of reloads, due to it being more brittle than brass they just don't last as long. I don't know anyone who reloads nickel plated, and i have never bought any factory reman'd ammo that was nickel plated. Maybe this is why it's preffered. :)
     

  3. Silicon Wolverine

    Silicon Wolverine Well-Known Member

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    Nickle brass will crack after only two or three loadings, especially if you load em hot. The original purpose for nickel plated cases was so they wouldnt corrode when left in leather loops on duty belts for long periods of time. They dont make one bit of difference in if a round will work witha given load or not, and some companies use them solely for the "blingy" look, like winchester silvertip rounds with a silver bullet and case or remington bronze point rounds.

    SW
     
  4. Some of them are just nickle plated and the plating peels off and as previously mentioned they can't be reloaded as often.
    I have reloaded the nickle plated.
    My carry ammo is nickle plated but I would never buy nickle coated cases to reload.
     
  5. I reload nickel cases. I don't load hot, so I get quite a few reloads before I have to chuck 'em.
     
  6. what about steel casings? can you reload like wolf or blazer steel???
     
  7. ColopatironXV deleted double post.... :D

    Steel casings can't be reloaded, aluminum cases can't be reloaded either.
     
  8. Silicon Wolverine

    Silicon Wolverine Well-Known Member

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    Steel cases CAN be relaoded but there enough problems with it, its economically unfeasible. They include:
    cost of berdan primers
    cost of berdan priming equipment
    steel cases wear out your dies 10x as fast
    cases last three loadings at most before cracking

    SW
     
  9. Hence the statement that they "can't" be reloaded... I never said it's not possible, merely suggesting that it's not worth the effort. Next time I promise to clarify my statement better. :D
     
  10. Uraijit

    Uraijit Guest

    Brass, nickel... They all get reloaded here. The nickel doesn't seem to last as long (as mentioned) but it works just fine. I use both until the case wears out...
     
  11. The only problem for me is most of the .50 AE cases I have are nickel plated. Now, the way I reload .50 AE is I take all my brass and tumble it all at once, and reload as I need ammo. Once I work my way through ALL the brass I have, I tumble again and start over. That way I know exactly how many loads are on each case. This just seems to me as if it's a bit more scientific, and I can more closely monitor how many loads I can safely get out of a single case, nickel or brass.
     
  12. Jokey

    Jokey Guest

    Be careful about blanket statements of internet lore.

    I have reloaded Wolf 223 and 45ACP. The 223 is made both in Berdan and Boxer the 45acp and 40sw are both only Boxer. I reload only Boxer and they reload fine.

    I have reloaded those rounds several times they seem to hold up normally.

    The only real issue I have had with them is that they can rust if not scavanged promptly There may be issues with long term storage.

    I have never seen aluminum cases that were not Berdan.

     
  13. Kagern

    Kagern Guest

    I've asked several reloaders at the local club about this in the past. The consensus among them was the nickel was fine for straight walled cartridges. They look nice, don't tarnish if they get wet, etc. They said to stay away from them on anything bottleneck, because they will start to flake and crack at the neck much sooner then normal brass.

    I know one guy who reloads steel. He does a lot of it actually. The only problem is, he's an idiot. I wouldn't trust him to change a tire.