Hi-Point Firearms Forums banner
1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
201 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok I have been looking into making my maverick into a dedicated HD shotgun...I have 2 other mossbergs but they lack the tacticool factor...Before the flaming begins...I have shot from the hip and have gotten good at it and like I said I have other shotty's with full stocks on them...

I am wanting to put a pistol grip on it and an 18.5" barrel...would I be breaking the law because it's not a full 26 inches overall? the barrel...18.5...and the reciever well I dont know how long but betting not 8 inches...and the pistol grip. I have seen numerous pumps with pistol grips and short barrels and even some offered from mossberg. so my question is does the overall lenghth rule not apply to a shotgun?

anyone with a set-up like this know the overall lenght of yours?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
313 Posts
well federal law states 18" on the barrel. Most everyone goes with 18.5 " to leave that little margin for error.

As far as overall length I can update this post later on and measure mine from grip to tip.
I have not heard anything about a required overall length though ...but you may want to check your local laws as some do tend ban pistol grips all together.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
201 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
ok..please do measure! Tennessee doesnt ban pistol grips its just I want to make sure I dont break any federal laws or anything I take alot of pictures and would hate to have my ass burned because of a shot gun I thought was legal...I am not talking about a SBS either just a mossberg HD barrel and a pistol grip.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
313 Posts
27 5/8 inches total length from grip to 18.5 inches on the barrel. The current barrel on the one in the pic is a 24inch slugger though I marked it out at 18.5 inches to take the measurement for you. That mossberg in the pic sees more different size pipe attached to it then a 42nd st hooker.

 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
201 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
you my friend are AWESOME. Thank you so much for taking your time to do something for a fellow HPFF member. Not many other boards would have followed through.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
345 Posts
DISCLAMOR: IN ORDER TO KEEP THIS POST AND THE HI-POINT FIREARMS FORUM (HPFF) FREE FROM ANY PERCIEVED OR IMPLIED NOTIONS OF LIABILITY IN OUR MODERN LITIGIOUS SOCIETY, I HEREBY DECLARE THAT THE FOLLOWING POST IS NOT INTENDED IN ANY WAY TO BE CONSTRUED AS PROFESSIONAL LEGAL CONSOLE OR ADVICE. THOSE INDIVIDUALS REQUIRING PROFESSIONAL LEGAL ASSISTANCE SHOULD CONSOLT THE LEGAL REPRESENTATION OF THIER CHOICE FOR ANY MATTERS, OFFICIAL OR OTHERWISE, THAT INVOLVE THE QUOTED LEGISLATION. OFFICIAL VIEWS FROM THE BATFE AND ANY OTHER APPLICABLE GOVERNMENT AGENCIES/ADMINISTRATIONS/AUTHORITIES SHOULD BE OBTAINED FROM THESE SOURCES DIRECTLY, AND THE VIEWS AND INFORMATION CONTAINED IN THIS POST ARE NOT NECESSARILY REPRESENTATIVE OF THE OFFICIAL VIEWS OF THE GOVERNMENT BODIES REGULATING THESE TOPICS AND PRACTICES. THIS POST IS INTENDED FOR INFORMATIONAL USE ONLY, AND NEITHER I NOR ANY MEMBER OF THE HPFF WILL BE HELD RESPONSIBLE FOR THE MISUSE OR ABUSE OF THIS INFORMATION. YOU ARE RESPONSBILE FOR YOUR OWN ACTIONS, SO PLEASE KEEP THIS IN MIND WHEN READING THIS INFORMATION.

...Now that THAT is out of the way, on to the body of my post...

I would like to clarify something that is, indeed, very confusing to a lot of people. There does exist a federal gun law, namely the National Firearms Act (NFA) of 1934, that specifically outlines the details of how long shotguns and rifles must be in order to be compliant with current regulations, namely 18" for shotgun barrels, 16" for rifle barrels, and a total overall length of 26" for shoulder-fired, stocked long arms.

By legal definition, the shotguns (and quite possibly some rifles as well) out there that were ORIGINALLY MANUFACTURED WITHOUT A STOCK and just have a pistol grip are not considered short-barreled shotguns, even though their barrels or their overall lengths are below the specified minimum lengths. So, for example, if one took a shotgun like the Mossberg Cruiser model and shortened the barrel below 18" and the overall length under 26", then the shotgun would not be considered a short-barreled shotgun; instead, it would be considered an AOW (Any-Other Weapon) which would be subject to only a $5 Federal tax stamp instead of the $200 tax stamp associated with Destructive Devices and short-barreled long arms (specified under the terms of the NFA of 1934. Such a shotgun becomes a cartridge-based firearm with a smoothbore barrel, and this is recognized by the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives (BATFE) as an AOW (specifically a smoothbore cartridge-based handgun) subject to the $5 tax stamp, although the gun can be moved across state lines without any previous Federal approval.

You might be wondering about a few other questions concerning these guns. For example, there does also exist pistols like the Thompson/Contender and Taurus Judge revolvers that shoot .410 shotgun shells in what, to an uninformed observer, would be under-length, illegal barrels. However, since these firearms have RIFLED barrels, these weapons are considered to be handguns and are not subject to the tax stamps mandated by the NFA. In addition, muzzleloading firearms that are smoothbore are exempt from this provision of the NFA since they are classified as an antique weapon. Also, smoothbore handguns that could be modified to fire cartridge-based shotshells are considered AOW's due to their increased destructive capacity--that is, their ability to take out several targets due to the wide shot spread--at extremely close ranges and their favored status as "gang weapons" amongst criminals who like their concealable, destructive nature for criminal activities. This legislation excludes the fact that such guns have legitimate uses by such people as ranchers and hikers who could use the close range spread of such a short-barreled shotgun/smoothbore handgun as a defensive weapon for eliminating threats like rattlesnakes. Rattlesnakes and similar threats are normally encountered at short ranges due to the ease with which one can stumble across such an animal. Of course, this gets back to the fundamental "blame-the-tool, not-the-intelligent-user" logical fallacy that avoids the proclamation of responsibility for actions on an individual, and this is another discussion entirely. This website-- http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/26/usc_sec_26_00005845----000-.html --contains the definitions that the NFA assigned to the term "firearm." Also, further definition of the term "firearm" can be found here at this URL: http://www4.law.cornell.edu/uscode/18/usc_sec_18_00000921----000-.html .

The NFA of 1934 and the Gun Control Act of 1968 were amongst the two landmark laws enacted in the United States that effectively define what our federal government sees as firearms. Other gun laws of major importance to firearms owners include the 1986 National Firearm Owners Protection Act (found here: http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/18/usc_sup_01_18_10_I_20_44.html ) and the 1994 Brady Handgun Violence Prevention Act, a.k.a. the "Brady Bill" and the "Assault Weapons Ban", (found here: http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/18/921-922.html ). My research on firearms legislation has been done over many years of vast searching, and while I am not an expert on firearms laws by the "professional" definition of an expert that a lawyer or academic professor would adhere to, my intense research has indicated that the later firearms legislation in 1986 and 1994 simply amended the original firearms laws from 1934 and 1968 with new provisions based on the whims of the politicians who proposed them. This has left America's major legislative efforts on gun control centered around an amazingly small amount of legislation that has been victim to the subjective, euphoric aspirations of politicians who reacted irrationally to such horrid occurrences as increased gang violence and school shootings.

During my research, I ran across a few posts on auction sites detailing double-barreled pistols called garruchas that originated in South America in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Some of these pistols were smoothbore, and as such, they may be considered AOW's under the NFA. Should you (or someone you know own one of these guns), this might be of interest. Aside from this little tidbit, I personally find the idea of double-barreled break-action pistols very appealing due to their ease of maintenance and rugged dependability due to very few mechanical parts. This type of weapon would be perfect for pilots, trappers, and other folks who venture deep into remote areas far from the support of our modern technological infrastructure. They could concievably be maintained and repaired using very simple tools and techniques, and this would be an important point for people using a weapon in such a remote place (one of the sellers on an auction site I found detailed this aspect of such guns in a neat little synopsis--you can find it here: http://www.gundeals.co.uk/Gaucho-Garrucha-500,name,224378,auction_id,auction_details ).

I did a Google search at this URL-- http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&rlz=1T4ADBF_enUS284US286&q=smooth-bore+pistol+%2B+smokeless+powder+%2B+NFA&start=10&sa=N --and uncovered a wealth of data concerning the NFA and similar gun laws.

Also, see these Wikipedia articles for more general information:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Firearms_Act

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Firearm_Owners_Protection_Act

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sawed-off_shotgun

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_v._Thompson-Center_Arms_Company

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brady_Handgun_Violence_Prevention_Act

Well, folks, I must sign off now. I hope this post was of use to the subject of short-barreled shotguns (SBS) and the like. Mods and Admins, this topic--gun legislation and laws--might be a good idea for a sticky. If you wanted me to, I could refine it with any changes that folks might suggest and submit it for review for such a sticky.

Thanks for reading, and have a good day!

Jag 8)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
478 Posts
Yea, what Jag said. I'll keep my hand gun with the hopes of never having to use it.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top