Recoil spring strength/rack action tough?

Discussion in 'Hi-Point Pistols' started by Metalcrack, Dec 13, 2014.

  1. Metalcrack

    Metalcrack Member

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    My wife has a hard time racking my SC XD.40 and I was wondering how hard the 380 is to rack for those with females that have input/opinions. Any direct comparisons?

    I've looked at all my locals and no one has a Hi point in stock for me to try.

    Also is the 380 have the same spring as the 9 just in case that's all I can find?
     
  2. TRWXXA

    TRWXXA Member

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    My 70 year old mother can rack the slide on my CF380 (soon to be hers). The spring is not too heavy, and the beefy slide is easy to grab.

    Just make sure you teach your wife the right way to manipulate the slide -- none of that dainty thumb and forefinger crap. Improper training and poor technique is what perpetuates the notion that women are too weak to operate a pistol.

    The Walther PK380 is also very easy to manipulate if you want her to give one of those a try.
     
    Last edited: Dec 14, 2014

  3. Johnny_B_Goode

    Johnny_B_Goode Member

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    Most 380 recoil springs are much lighter than 9mm springs (20lb avg). Teach her to use the rear sight to hook the slide on a flat surface so she can just push down with her weight to rack the slide. A Bersa Thunder is another heavy 380 that is easy for people with arthritis and other orthopedic injuries of the hand/s to manipulate.

    There is tool called a Handi Racker that makes it much easier to rack the slide on any gun.
     
  4. lklawson

    lklawson Staff Member

    Proper technique can help a lot. Check the links which SWAGA referenced. If those can't get h er where she needs to go then have her try out different gun at the LGS, maybe even something with a lighter slide. Something like the Kel Tec PMR30 or the Ruger SR22 if those calibers are acceptable. You might also investigate tip up their roles such as many Taurus PT22. If those calibers are unacceptable and you really want a little bit larger center fire option you might try a table rack technique. Or even see if you can find an old beretta tip up 380. Otherwise you may end up deciding on a revolver such as a 38 snub.

    Peace favor your sword (mobile)
     
  5. TRWXXA

    TRWXXA Member

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    Not sure I like the idea of using the edge of a table or your foot for normal slide manipulation. It means that the muzzle is pointed somewhere other than safely downrange. Yes, one should be familiar with alternative ways to cycle the pistol, but they are for emergency situations (like the bad guy you are gonna ventilate has just slashed your support hand with a knife) and best practiced in a dry-fire situation.

    Rack the slide with the hands close to the body (like a compressed retention position). Use opposing muscle groups authoritatively push the gun forward with the strong hand, and pull the slide backward with the support HAND (not support thumb and index finger).
     
  6. cicpup

    cicpup Resident PITA Supporting Member

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    "Nevermind" - Rosanna Rosannadanna.
     
  7. Bull

    Bull Just a Man Supporting Member


    Those were funny!
     
  8. undeRGRound

    undeRGRound ROLL wif Da MOLE! Supporting Member

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    ALSO:
    Keep the slide locked back for a week or longer if it is a tad too heavy...
    I sold a Taurus PT22 with the Tip-Up that Kirk listed to a guy, and he said it racked too hard, and he tore it all down, lubed it up really good and said it helped a lot! I told him that is what the tip-up was for, and he said he didn't know that (but I had told him) :D
     
  9. undeRGRound

    undeRGRound ROLL wif Da MOLE! Supporting Member

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    [ame]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wznjAhZ0eWc[/ame]
     
  10. cicpup

    cicpup Resident PITA Supporting Member

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  11. lklawson

    lklawson Staff Member

    If you chamber a round in your home or somewhere other than at the range, it is always going to be pointed somewhere other than down range. Just make sure you keep it pointed some direction without human bodies in the way, such as the floor.

    Peace favor your sword (mobile)
     
    Last edited: Dec 15, 2014
  12. Metalcrack

    Metalcrack Member

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    Thanks for the tips. She has a snub but the trigger is too rough (S&W Bodyguard 38spl). The local gunsmith can't do much with the trigger as they are like a module, so no work can be done. I want to take her to check out the Ruger 38 offering as it seemed much smoother.

    She likes the idea of a revolver as we discussed.....no real jams.......just pull it again. My ideas with the 380 was home defense. Quicker reloads and higher capacity.

    We'll keep on looking.....and what's the worst case......a 380 for me to shoot......shucks.
     
  13. TRWXXA

    TRWXXA Member

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    Gee... Thanks for the safety tip. :rolleyes:

    You don't practice shooting at home either.

    If you don't practice, you shouldn't be carrying. Shooting is a perishable skill.

    If you need to use a tool to manipulate the firearm in normal situations, it is going to do you no good in an emergency situation. Bad guy is coming to inflict serious bodily harm upon you, and suddenly it's not a real good time to be looking for a table edge to help you clear that failure to feed malfunction.
     
  14. SWAGA

    SWAGA No longer broke... Lifetime Supporter

    you could keep the gun in your home with a loaded chamer and the safety on.
    No need to go racking the gun when the bad men come in.
     
  15. Bull

    Bull Just a Man Supporting Member


    Most home defense is close range anyway...... Not exactly a "perishable shooting skill" problem.... Also kinda the point of guns for home defense, is that an old woman can be on even ground with a young man, when she HAS to defend herself....... But if you want to tell your 80 year old mom that if she can't go shoot hundreds of rounds a month in her gun to get rid of it, go ahead.... I'm not telling mine that.
     
  16. lklawson

    lklawson Staff Member

    Gee, thanks for the douchely response. :rolleyes:
    YOU are the one who specified "safely downrange" as the reason why you wouldn't want to use an alternative chambering technique, not me.

    Yes I do.

    Tell me more.

    Unless you have that or a similar "tool" near to hand and have trained to use it. Any surface that has an "edge" would substitute, such as a counter-top, a door frame, a corner, a cabinet edge, a bed frame, a desk top, or (most commonly) a sturdy belt, etc.

    You're acting as if this hasn't been thought through or something. This is a well known and long-time instructed technique for chambering a round in automatics "one handed" and is often taught to LEO and others as a method for chambering a round when their secondary hand is occupied or injured.

    But, heck, don't believe me, maybe you'll feel better rolling your eyes at The American Rifleman, an NRA publication, " A table, wall corner or even a tree works..." : http://www.americanrifleman.org/blogs/one-handed-tap-rack

    Variations of this method are standard for U.S. Marines too:

    http://www.marines.mil/Portals/59/Publications/MCRP%203-01B%20Pistol%20Marksmanship.pdf Check pp 1-11, figure 1-23.

    I'm still wondering why one would chose to have a firearm intended for self defense in an unloaded state.

    Anyhoo... check the attitude, it'll get you further in life.

    Peace favor your sword,
    Kirk
     
  17. Dave4903

    Dave4903 My other car is a M60A3 Supporting Member


    The long trigger pull on the Bodyguard is a complaint that I've heard more than a few times. The Glock 42 gets good reviews with regard to ease of operation.
     
  18. colthrash

    colthrash Member

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    the bersa series 380's are fairly gentle to rack, and the "plus" is 15+1...
     
  19. greg_r

    greg_r Lifetime Supporter

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    The CF380 is easy to rack, plus the slide is large providing more gripping surface. Has lighter recoil spring than the C9. A couple of others that are easy to rack are the Ruger LC380 and the Glock 42. A larger 380 such as there can be easier to operate than a DA revolver for people with arthritis or weak hands.