Seeds

Discussion in 'Vintage Topic Archive (Sept - 2009)' started by Spot, Feb 14, 2008.

  1. Just a reminder. At the dollar store and wal-mart you can find seeds for $.10 per pack. All different types of vegtable seeds . These would make good barter items after TSHTF and people start relising that the grocers don't have any food.
    Who knows what you might be able to get for a $.10 investment :wink:
    Spot
     
  2. 69burbon

    69burbon Well-Known Member

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    Good point. It's a good idea to stock up. I rotate seeds every couple years. I buy the seeds I use and then vacuum seal them for future use. Most seeds will keep for several years like this.

    I also buy items like organic wheat from a bulk supplier. We use it for bread, plus it can be sown in a side lot and harvested when the time comes. You can do the same thing with beans.
     

  3. joebob88

    joebob88 Guest

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    I've already started saving seeds.
     
  4. If you have old seeds and want to see if they still germinate , put 10 seeds on a moist paper towel and put in a sunny location for a few days, make sure that the paper towel stays moist . If they start to sprout you will know that the batch that you took the sample from is good to keep.
    Spot
     
  5. Seeds are a great idea, but you need to look up each brand to see how to plant them. Some do great just throwing them in the ground. Tomatoes do better when you transplant them from a starter tray. Corn, for example, has to be planted in multiple rows to germinate as it cross-pollenates. One row of corn will yeild nothing. Also, in a bug-out situation, planting food means you have planted your roots as well. Make very sure you are where you want to be. :wink:
     
  6. Great Idea... Crazy how the simple things like this can slipi your mind. Be at wal-mart today...
     
  7. Kelotravolski

    Kelotravolski Member

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    I would suggest starting a garden now so you know how to do it. There are also some tools you may want to invest in; without a Rototiller you are going to break your back with the hoe trying to till the ground. There is a lot of work that goes into growing a big garden and the reward is directly related to the amount of work you put into it. A small garden is fun to care for and adds some food to your meals but will not provide even enough food for one person to live through winter.
     
  8. Yeah we had a garden as kids (and you know who got to do all of the garden work lol)..... I live in a populated area. So the yard is tiny... might have to get a small garden going this spring?????
     
  9. SHOOTER Z

    SHOOTER Z Well-Known Member

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    Either a small garden or use planter boxes for a few items this will help you figure out what to plant ect
     
  10. 69burbon

    69burbon Well-Known Member

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    Raised beds are the way to go for most people these days. They are easy to maintain and don't weed up like a regular garden does. One thing I am trying to do is plant my yard with usable plants instead of the normal ornamentals. I turned one area into an ornamental herb garden. The path along my sidewalk has my pepper plants (I make my own hot sauce :D). I run my cucumbers, beans and other vine type plants up a trellis to save space and make them easier to harvest. If possible replace large windows in your house with bay type windows so you can have room to plant all year long. You can plant a salad garden in pots inside the house and harvest all year long.
     
  11. It would make more sense to garden in squares. There is a book out called the square foot gardener and is a very good guide for small gardens.

    Kelo, I was kinda referring to this as at a bugout location. Sorry, but I don't think a rototiller and the fuel needed for it would fit in my bug-out plans. Besides, the garden size you're talking about would be a monster project for a rototiller. A John Deere tractor would make a lot more sense.

    If you plan on bugging in, you might want to look at planting fruit trees as well, depending on what part of the country you live in. Back in Carolina, we had a couple of walnut trees in the front yard. That was pretty cool except if you were standing under it when they fell off!!
     
  12. SHOOTER Z

    SHOOTER Z Well-Known Member

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    Back in Carolina, we had a couple of walnut trees in the front yard. That was pretty cool except if you were standing under it when they fell off!!


    Hard hat time :lol: :lol: [​IMG]
     
  13. 69burbon

    69burbon Well-Known Member

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    CG-49
    That is basically what I am doing only I am using the raised beds. I live on a fairly useless city size corner lot so my yard is useless for doing much. Plus we have a lot of clay where I am at so I already have to add soil to break it up. The raised beds are just much easier to maintain. My boxes are roughly 3X3. I planted acorn squash last year and it took over one whole corner of the yard! I don't think I'll do that this year since I didn't get much yield for the loss of space.
     
  14. Yeah, my grandmother lived in High Point, North Carolina and her yard was mostly clay and it was a real mother when it was wet. It stuck to everything. When I lived in San Diego, my backyard was cut from a hillside and hard as granite. I rented a rototiller, wet the ground and still could barely scratch it, much less dig in. I ended up building two planter boxes about 16 feet long by 4 feet wide.

    Had a truckload of topsoil delivered and dumped in my driveway. Wheelbarrowed it all to the backyard. Mixed in a bunch of fertilizer and compost and grew some awesome veggies in them. My zucchini squash would reach two feet in length and the tomatoes were the size of softballs.

    Anyway, I went to Home Depot and bought landscape logs. I stacked them about six high, drilled holes in every layer and drove rebar into the ground to steady them. I used the linclon log approach and it worked very well. We still had a garden going when we sold it six years later.