SKS - Brass Jag Stuck in Barrel :/

Discussion in 'Vintage Topic Archive (Sept - 2009)' started by esududeny, May 3, 2008.

  1. So, I got up early today and thought " Hey, I don't have to be anywhere anytime soon, I'll go clean my rifles". M44's done, 9mm carbine's done, even the mossy500 was done. I'm working on my sks and the rod stops a little into the barrel. I force it down a little more and that's it, it's stuck. I pulled on the rod as hard as i could only to snap it off the jag :/ . THEN I took the rod , which seemed pretty solid and ran it down the other end of the barrel, to try and drive out the jag. Gave it a few good whacks and now that's stuck in there!

    Advice?
     
  2. Thayldt21

    Thayldt21 Senior Member Member

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    Last resort Fire, Burn the Patch and then lube it up and work the lag out.

    Again last resort.
     

  3. Strangerous

    Strangerous Member

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    The first mistake was running something from the opposite end, but heck, It's the most effective way to learn!... Right?

    You already had to force it down the barrel, so when it finally stopped (too much/thick of patch on the jag) you broke the jag off in it.
    All you did when you attempted to push from the other end was manage to get your cleaning rod wedged between your barrel and broken jag. With the broken jag in there, and it being tighter that Dick's hat-band already, theres no way it's going to come out in the opposite direction. I suggest you store the SKS with muzzle down, paper plate on floor and let it sit with a descent ammount of good penetrating oil (enough to drip onto the paper plate if it penetrates through the blockage) down the barrel. This way you can see if the penetrating oil has made it past the blockage, and if it has, attempt to remove your cleaning rod from the thing first, if you can't get it, STOP and call a gunsmith.

    If you can remove it, proceed and use a dowel rod or your cleaning rod again to attempt to remove the jag. Don't put any jags or tips on the rod when you use it to clear a blockage. Go in the DIRECTION YOU STARTED IN. If you have a screw-together cleaning rod, then don't leave too much rod hanging out of the barrel, and if it's not strong then you may want to get a piece of hard wood to put as a buffer between it and the hammer you're gonna have to use to drive the jag out of the other end.

    Let me know how it works out.
     
  4. Strangerous

    Strangerous Member

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    hmmm. Burn the patch that is down the barrel, i'm thinking about 1/2 way? I'm gonna say not feasible Thay... lack of oxygen in there, no to mention unable to get fire down far enough to let it catch... and fire= bad. :lol:
     
  5. Thayldt21

    Thayldt21 Senior Member Member

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    45B, Small arms repairer,, did this to an M16A2 when Private Joe Snuffy got his brush stuck when he decided to put a few patches around it they used a small propain tourch. And it was fine after they removed the stuck brush. This took place in Schwienfurt Germany on Conn Barracks sometime before Feb 04 prior to deployment to OIFII.

    If you would like I can send you the 45B AKO email address so you can ask him yourself.
     
  6. Thayldt21

    Thayldt21 Senior Member Member

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    I should add that they did not try to heat inside the bore chamber they just heated the barrel.
     
  7. Strangerous

    Strangerous Member

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    Thay, you know as well as i do heating up the barrel and actually burning something stuck inside the barrel are 2 different things altogether, I wouldn't have said a word if you would have used the correct terminology of the method you were advising to the OP.
    Heating up the barrel makes sense.
    Wen you said "Burn the patch", it didn't sound like "heat up the barrel". Is that safe to say Thay? That it doesn't sound like the same method? I believe it is.
     
  8. If worst came to worst and I had to bring it to a gunsmith, how much is that gonna run me? Round-about price?
     
  9. Strangerous

    Strangerous Member

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    Depends on how proud the gunsmith is, it's just like a plumber. Yellow pages should have them (if any) listed with addresses and phone numbers. I'd call around and explain the situation to them, that way they know what they're getting into. I'm sure you're not the first, and probably won't be the last fella to have this happen to him. And in the same aspect of a plumber, gunsmiths are like a proctologist, too. (They've seen just about everything stuck in the tube). :lol:
     
  10. Thayldt21

    Thayldt21 Senior Member Member

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    Wow there a little Confrontational are we Strangerous.

    I think it would be common knowlkedge how to burn a patch out.. But I guess not every one thinks alike.

    Again my first post wasnt to indepth as I would assume common sence would be used.

    This is the only time I have every witnessed said method but have for many a year heard about it.

    Now For your condecending tone, Strangerous I dont care for. I think you, Strangerous read Way to far into a simple post.
     
  11. Strangerous

    Strangerous Member

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    Esududeny, please keep us updated on what the outcome of your misadventure is.

    Thay, I'm sorry if i came of with condescending tone.
     
  12. Good news, gentlemen. I got it out . I hit it with alot of Rem oil, got the rod out, but this time didn't go crazy with the rod. Just tapped the jag outward, little by little. Everyonce in awhile making sure the rod wasn't stuck. There doesn't seem to be any damage to the rifling but I'll make sure tomorrow. Need to pick up a borelight.

    Again, thanks for all the info and support :)
     
  13. Strangerous

    Strangerous Member

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    esududeny,
    Try this:
    1.Unload all of the ammo out of your mosin, and clear your rifle.
    2.Open the bolt and slide it all the way back.
    3.Get a white piece of paper, and a descent flashlight.
    4. Cut/tear the paper so that you can wrap it around your index finger tape it ifs necessary to make it stay.
    4.With the flashlight in your right hand, with yourself seated, paper on your index finger, and your rifle muzzle up between your legs:
    4.1-Put your paper'd finger in to the chamberarea, about 1/2" to 3/4" away from where the round is chambered.
    4.2-Illuminate the white paper with the best focused beam you can make.
    4.3-Peer down the barrel and look for obvious damage.

    You can do this with handguns without the paper, and a bare finger will reflect enough light on it's own; The longer barrels in a rifle need the white paper to reflect the light... mirrors produce a sharp light that makes the barrel shine, the paper gives an even opaque light... just as the "umbrellas" do for the flash in photography.

    Tell us how this works for you too!
    :lol: