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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey, just got this C9 and put about 80 rounds through it for the first time. I looked at the barrel, and noticed a small nick on there. Is that just normal wear and tear? I’m worried it might effect the accuracy or something like that. I’ve attached a pic. Any advice would be greatly appreciated. Thanks.
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What moonz said. How did it shoot?

If it did not shoot accurately it is an easy fix with just a brass bolt and some rubbing compound.
 

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Yeah it’s my first Hi-Point. I bought it new from Sportsman’s Warehouse. I got it a few weeks a ago and just put my first rounds through it.
If you sent it back to the factory and pointed the issue out, they'd probably replace the barrel, and maybe ship it back with a new extra mag too. But if it shoots straight....why bother. (y)

And then...one of the best things about Hi Points is, if it were shooting wonky and you DID decide to try to lap it with the brass bolt, and it doesn't help....they'd still replace the barrel.
 

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If you sent it back to the factory and pointed the issue out, they'd probably replace the barrel, and maybe ship it back with a new extra mag too. But if it shoots straight....why bother. (y)

And then...one of the best things about Hi Points is, if it were shooting wonky and you DID decide to try to lap it with the brass bolt, and it doesn't help....they'd still replace the barrel.
Shit, it's Hi Point. You could probably take the Lee chamfer tool to it in an attempt to re-crown the barrel and they wouldn't blink if you sent it back in...
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
If you sent it back to the factory and pointed the issue out, they'd probably replace the barrel, and maybe ship it back with a new extra mag too. But if it shoots straight....why bother. (y)

And then...one of the best things about Hi Points is, if it were shooting wonky and you DID decide to try to lap it with the brass bolt, and it doesn't help....they'd still replace the barrel.
I’m still kind of learning the in and outs. Are there any brass bolts you would recommend? I’m trying to look some up but don’t think I have the right tool in mind.
 

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I’m still kind of learning the in and outs. Are there any brass bolts you would recommend? I’m trying to look some up but don’t think I have the right tool in mind.
Its a bolt/screw. Not a tool.
 

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King of you Monkeys
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Or you could just buy either of these. Id go with the one on the right. Countersink. Get a bigger size though.I use those on aluminum, brass, hS steel and titanium. Use lots of oil.
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I’m still kind of learning the in and outs. Are there any brass bolts you would recommend? I’m trying to look some up but don’t think I have the right tool in mind.
Basically you want to buy a slotted, round head, brass screw that's head is larger than the diameter of your crown. You can then either screw it in to a board and spin the barrel on the screw, or chuck the screw in your favorite drill then SLOWLY AND GENTLY "polish" out the burr...
 
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Shoots straight? Fuggitaboutit.
 

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If it needs some touchup in your opinion to look better, just get out your drill and a large (larger than the bore) countersink bit. Don't use a drill bit as that could grab hold of the steel and dig in. A counterbore will only ride the surface and give an angled cut that you have control of how deep of an angle cut you want, as if you're going to use a sunken pan head screw in wood.

Just stabilize the gun in a padded vise. Go very slow with the cut and in this case, forget the oil as it will only roll down the barrel and sling off the bit. Use some grease (of your choice) as there won't be much to cut off the metal to clean up, then hit the raw metal with some Birchwood Casey's cold blue to touchup after cleaning off the grease with some brake cleaner to rid of any oils and grease. You can find it at Walmart if they have a sporting goods area that sell gun supplies for less than $10.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
If it needs some touchup in your opinion to look better, just get out your drill and a large (larger than the bore) countersink bit. Don't use a drill bit as that could grab hold of the steel and dig in. A counterbore will only ride the surface and give an angled cut that you have control of how deep of an angle cut you want, as if you're going to use a sunken pan head screw in wood.

Just stabilize the gun in a padded vise. Go very slow with the cut and in this case, forget the oil as it will only roll down the barrel and sling off the bit. Use some grease (of your choice) as there won't be much to cut off the metal to clean up, then hit the raw metal with some Birchwood Casey's cold blue to touchup after cleaning off the grease with some brake cleaner to rid of any oils and grease. You can find it at Walmart if they have a sporting goods area that sell gun supplies for less than $10.
Can’t thank you enough for this breakdown. Greatly appreciated!
 

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Personally, I’d not use a countersink bit. A large brass headed screw or bolt is soft enough to not tear the barrel up, and is probably going to be radiused larger, so it won’t cut such a sharp shoulder. Not that a sharp shoulder is bad. But it’s more likely to catch and chatter on any rifling you run into.
 

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Personally, I’d not use a countersink bit. A large brass headed screw or bolt is soft enough to not tear the barrel up, and is probably going to be radiused larger, so it won’t cut such a sharp shoulder. Not that a sharp shoulder is bad. But it’s more likely to catch and chatter on any rifling you run into.
Precisely the reason I suggested the brass screw and compound. Plus it will cost you maybe $10, if that.

Of course you could get yourself something like a Manson crowning kit, that will cost you about $400 or so. Sweet tool. A 79 degree crown cutter with a pilot and 1/4x20 drill adapter will cost you about $100, you can piece a kit together on eBay. But the brass screw will work exceptionally well.

Or there is always the easy way out, send it to MOM.

Honestly, if you are satisfied with the accuracy, and it shoots well, which it appears your’s does, I would not mess with it. More firearms have been messed up by trying to make them better when they are not broke. But if you must, just go slow. Remember the saying, "you can go too slow a lot, but you can only go too fast once".

Here is a video showing crowning a barrel with a brass screw. It will give you the idea how it works.
 
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