Some interesting (widely unknown?) WW2 Info

Discussion in 'Vintage Topic Archive (Sept - 2009)' started by Taurus357, Dec 7, 2007.

  1. http://members.iinet.net.au/~gduncan/1944.html

    Some interesting stuff.

     
  2. Really interesting read, thanks for finding it.

    A couple of small stories from my time in Germany.

    I met a soldier that had spent time at Spandau Prison (where Rudolph Hess was kept until he died).

    He was convinced that the prison was haunted, and told me that there were areas of the prison that the guards would not go to, they would just mark on their papers that they had been there and bypass them.


    I visited Dachau concentration camp (in southern Germany) while I was there, saw all of the blood trenches and the gas chambers and ovens.

    Very creepy place, it was a beautiful sunny day but there were no birds singing or any natural noises.

    It was very unsettling to be at a place where so many people had been violently killed.

    I was glad that I went there and verified that yes, it did happen, but I was also very glad when we left because my nerves were wound tight for some reason.

    I will always remember the sign above the gate, "Work will make you Free" (Arbeit Macht Frei)
     

  3. SHOOTER Z

    SHOOTER Z Well-Known Member

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    Another little known fact of WW2 2 Dec 1943 German bombers attacked the port of Bari Italy where the +ALlies were useing as a supply port. One of the ships John Harvey was carring Mustard Bombs when it was sunk in the raid and untold thousands of Italians and hundreds of Allied troops were killed or wounded by mustard gas I have a book Disaster at Bari by Glen Infield very good reading
     
  4. Ari

    Ari Guest

    It was fun to read....

    Where it said "Just months before the 50th anniversary of the landings, the Pegasus Bridge was demolished" This is not true as I have been on the real bridge after then. It was saved and moved to a field next the new bridge. If you ever get a chance to get to Ouistreham it is worth seeing.
     
  5. Its ironic that for all of Hitlers atroticies committed, he did not consider using chemical weapons, even when the war was going bad for him. He had a fear of them, because he himself was gassed during WWI.

    Its sad but not surprising to hear that we had them ready to use and we were the "good guys".
     
  6. Ari

    Ari Guest

     
  7. Point taken, I think he did not use it on the battlefield because he was scared of retaliation, but when it came to the gas chambers, they were looking for the cheapest most efficient method of killing and did not have to worry about counterattacks from the prisoners, if that makes any sense.
     
  8. From what I saw on Mail Call, the whole deal with JP as the origins of Jeep is bunk. Will have to keep an eye out for that episode.
     
  9. SHOOTER Z

    SHOOTER Z Well-Known Member

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    I always thought Jeep or GP stood for General Purpose.
     
  10. IIRC (from Mail Call) th JP designation actually came from the manufacturer, not the military, and it didn't mean "general pourpos" (just cant remember what it stood for :oops:
     
  11. from wikipedia:

    The origin of the term "jeep"
    There are many stories about where the word "jeep" came from. Although they make for interesting and memorable tales, they are difficult to verify.

    Probably the most popular notion has it that the vehicle bore the designation "GP" (for "General Purpose"), which was phonetically slurred into the word jeep. R. Lee Ermey, on his television series Mail Call, disputes this, saying that the vehicle was designed for specific duties, was never referred to as "General Purpose", and that the name may have been derived from Ford's nomenclature referring to the vehicle as GP (G for government-use, and P to designate its 80-inch wheelbase). "General purpose" does appear in connection with the vehicle in the WW2 TM 9-803 manual, which describes the vehicle as "... a general purpose, personnel, or cargo carrier especially adaptable for reconnaissance or command, and designated as ¼-ton 4x4 Truck", and the vehicle is designated a "GP" in TM 9-2800, Standard Military Motor Vehicles, September 1, 1943, but whether the average jeep-driving GI would have been familiar with either of these manuals is open to debate.

    This version of the story may be confused with the nickname of another series of vehicles with the GP designation. The Electro-Motive Division of General Motors, a maker of railroad locomotives, introduced its "General Purpose" line in 1949, using the GP tag. These locomotives are commonly referred to as Geeps, pronounced the same way as "Jeep".

    Many, including Ermey, claim that the likelier origin refers to the character Eugene the Jeep in the Thimble Theater (Popeye) comic strip. Eugene the Jeep was dog-like and could walk through walls and ceilings, climb trees, fly, and just about go anywhere it wanted; it is thought that soldiers at the time were so impressed with the new vehicle's versatility that they informally named it after the character. The character "Eugene the Jeep" was created in 1936.

    The term "jeep" was first commonly used during World War I (1914–1918) by soldiers as a slang word for new recruits and for new unproven vehicles. This is according to a history of the vehicle for an issue of the U.S. Army magazine, Quartermaster Review, which was written by Maj. E. P. Hogan. He went on to say that the slang word "jeep" had these definitions as late as the start of World War II.

    "Jeep" had been used as the name of a small tractor made by Modine.

    The term "jeep" would eventually be used as slang to refer to an airplane, a tractor used for hauling heavy equipment, and an autogyro. When the first models of the jeep came to Camp Holabird for tests, the vehicle did not have a name yet. Therefore the soldiers on the test project called it a jeep. Civilian engineers and test drivers who were at the camp during this time were not aware of the military slang term. They most likely were familiar with the character Eugene the Jeep and thought that Eugene was the origin of the name. The vehicle had many other nicknames at this time such as Peep and Pygmy and Blitz-Buggy, although because of the Eugene association, Jeep stuck in people's minds better than any other term.

    Words of the Fighting Forces by Clinton A. Sanders, a dictionary of military slang, published in 1942, in the library at The Pentagon gives this definition:

    Jeep: A four-wheel drive car of one-half to one-and-one-half ton capacity for reconnaissance or other army duty. A term applied to the bantam-cars, and occasionally to other motor vehicles (U.S.A.) in the Air Corps, the Link Trainer; in the armored forces, the ½ ton command car. Also referred to as "any small plane, helicopter, or gadget."
    Early in 1941, Willys-Overland demonstrated the vehicle's ability by having it drive up the U.S. Capitol steps, driven by Willy's test driver Irving "Red" Haussman, who had recently heard soldiers at Fort Holabird calling it a "jeep". When asked by syndicated columnist Katherine Hillyer for the Washington Daily News (or by a bystander, according to another account) what it was called, Irving answered, "It's a jeep."

    Katherine Hillyer's article was published on February 20, 1941 around the nation and included a picture of the vehicle with the caption:

    LAWMAKERS TAKE A RIDE- With Senator Meade, of New York, at the wheel, and Representative Thomas, of New Jersey, sitting beside him, one of the Army's new scout cars, known as "jeeps" or "quads", climbs up the Capitol steps in a demonstration yesterday. Soldiers in the rear seat for gunners were unperturbed.
    This exposure caused all other jeep references to fade, leaving the 4x4 truck with the name.

    Willys-Overland Inc. was later awarded the sole privilege of owning the name "Jeep" as registered trademark, by extension, merely because it originally had offered the most powerful engine.
     
  12. Mo mention of "Jeep Jeep" the popeye character that went and crawled everywhere?
     
  13. Its up there in all of that mess of mine Taurus

    Many, including Ermey, claim that the likelier origin refers to the character Eugene the Jeep in the Thimble Theater (Popeye) comic strip. Eugene the Jeep was dog-like and could walk through walls and ceilings, climb trees, fly, and just about go anywhere it wanted; it is thought that soldiers at the time were so impressed with the new vehicle's versatility that they informally named it after the character. The character "Eugene the Jeep" was created in 1936
     
  14. AHAH! I missed it. All the text is messed up so it's hard to read everything and not miss parts. Ohwell.