Stupid Question About Cleaning the c9 9MM

Discussion in 'General Hi-Point Discussion' started by Rhetorician, May 14, 2015.

  1. Rhetorician

    Rhetorician Member

    Hello all:

    For the record I have just about talked myself into buying a c9 9mm. I have watched all of the videos and read all of the opinions. Let me tell you what put me over the top!!! These five things put me in the mood to buy one and try it:

    1. Initial costs!
    2. Costs of the 9mm ammunition.
    3. Heavy factor, I have some light weight carry pieces now--Ruger LCR 357, Taurus 738 380acp, and a Smith Model 360PD--all really light and snappy when shot. I wanted to try the 9mm to be able to judge the cartridge w/o the muzzle flip.
    4. One basically does not have to clean the c9, even according to the factory specs.
    5. I am a revolver man and do not like to break autos apart to clean them.

    So here is my "Stupid Question About Cleaning the c9?" Can I just take the grip panels off and put it in a bucket of solvent like brake fluid later, say after 500 rounds to clean it? Further, is there anything there that would melt or dissolve in a solvent?

    I know it is a dumb question but some here will know. I was told that the trigger and the safety are made of plastic. So will they be hurt?:rolleyes:

    Please answer in kindness and do not flame me. :D

    "That is all!";)

    rd
     
  2. Think1st

    Think1st Supporting Member

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    The frame, itself, is polymer, so removing the grips doesn't mitigate the effects of solvent on the plastic pieces. If you want to give a solvent bath to it, I'd just stick with throwing the slide in and suspend the frame-barrel assembly so that the barrel, alone, is in the solvent.
     

  3. cicpup

    cicpup Resident PITA Supporting Member

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    No need to pull the grips. Just remove the slide and you can access all the dirty parts. Your solvent won't melt the metal parts. Test it on the plastic.

    Or

    Remove the mag. Lock the slide back. Toss in dishwasher. Blast with RemOil when done. Shoot another 10,000 rounds.
     
  4. lklawson

    lklawson Staff Member

    500 rounds? Just lock back the slide and clean the barrel & chamber as normal (lots of people like to use the boresnake). Clean everything else with a toothbrush and a q-tip (especially the channel in the slide for the dolls-head). Don't worry about breaking it down until at least 3-5 times that number of rounds. Lube it and go back to shooting. These things are particularly tolerant of grime.

    There are several standard complaints about the Hi Point handgun design. "I have to keep the fool thing spotless" isn't one of them. :)


    Use an acetone free solvent. If you're planning on soaking it in Ed's Red, just leave out the acetone ingredient. If you're planning on soaking it in Hoppes #9, you're good to go.


    The trigger, the frame, the grips, are all resin ("plastic"). Even the slide is powder coated (a kind of plastic, ims). But the safety lever isn't.

    Too late. But you'll kinda like it. ;)

    [​IMG]

    Peace favor your sword,
    Kirk
     
  5. Rhetorician

    Rhetorician Member

    Rhetorician Reply...

    Kirk,

    It is OK, I have been flamed by better people than y'all!!! LOL!

    Three follow up questions:

    1. They are joking about putting it in the dish washer, right?

    2. How is the trigger pull on the c9 out of the box?

    3. How is the sighting right out of the box? I hate to buy a brand new gun then have to go through all of that?

    Please be kind? LOL! :p

    rd
     
  6. Rhetorician

    Rhetorician Member

    Dishwasher?

    Dishwasher? You are kidding right? :rolleyes: :D Sound like this may be the AK of all pistols?

    Thanks.

    rd
     
  7. cicpup

    cicpup Resident PITA Supporting Member

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    Maybe. Try it. I guarantee you won't hurt it any. Just don't forget the RemOil. Don't want the 3 or 4 steel parts to rust.
     
  8. cicpup

    cicpup Resident PITA Supporting Member

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    Well aint you lucky. Lucky they include a free tool so you don't have to find a screwdriver.
     
  9. lklawson

    lklawson Staff Member

    Now you hurt my feelings. :wah:

    Umm... maybe a little...

    Honestly, I don't think anyone here has actually tried that with a fully assembled C9 as a method of cleaning it. However, I do know of people who have put disassembled gun parts through the dishwasher (car parts too). It's a $170 gun, and I certainly wouldn't put it past some of the yahoos here!

    Anywhere from "hey, that ain't too bad" to "did the factory put sand in there?" Very hit or miss. I really doubt that the factory spends too much time polishing the trigger bar and the sear interface. The trigger does, however, usually smooth out with use.

    Usually spot on. Although the sights are pretty cheap, they're highly visible and are typically sighted in right for about 30' right out of the box. Of course, just as soon as I write that, you'll get the one made on friday with a 30lb trigger made from sandstone and the sights which are right on only if you're cross-eyed, near sighted in one eye and far sighted in the other. :blush:

    The most common issue with the C9 is feed failures which can usually be attributed to the magazine being out of spec, though many people choose to polish the feed ramp (which is painted for some reason) and report that this often helps a great deal.

    Look pal, I didn't get married, have to kids, and get old & injured just so I can not have an excuse to be crotchety! ;)

    Peace favor your sword,
    Kirk
     
  10. duster066

    duster066 Supporting Member

    The dishwasher idea actually isn't to bad. Those who know me know I'm a clean gun freak, and nothing in this thread has changed my mind. Any effective way to clean a gun it's better than not cleaning it. When I do a "deep clean", full tear down, I always wash the parts in hot soapy water after a solvent cleaning. It lifts and washed away the tiny grit and sand particles that will not evaporate away with the solvent. So a good flush and scrub with solvent followed by a trip through a dishwasher will do a good job. The issue becomes getting all the water out. I have compressed air, but there are other ways.

    Wait for it Kirk, wait for it... Yup there is a good use for WD40. A bath of WD will get all the water out. Then spray it with your favorite gun lube, and wipe away all the excess you can and you'll have a clean, happy, and ready to rock gun.

    Rant on, again: Those who argue you don't need comprehensive gun maintenance, including frequent cleaning are on the wrong side of history. And all they need to do to figure out why it's a great idea is to "deep clean" a gun that has been ignored for years or decades. The difference in how smooth the action is and how well the gun shoots will make a believer out of you. To not clean, deeply every few years or so, defeats the gained benefit of breaking in a new gun. All those little moving parts rub other and become good friends ready to rock. Only to have the owner ignore them and allow them to become gummed up with sludge and gritty grim. Shame
     
  11. cicpup

    cicpup Resident PITA Supporting Member

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    Yea. You shake it vigorously. It's a Hi-Point.
     
  12. Rhetorician

    Rhetorician Member

    Rhetorician Reply...

    Duster,

    So then you do not even follow Hi Point's rec on cleaning?:rolleyes:

    Please advise when possible. :)

    rd
     
  13. Think1st

    Think1st Supporting Member

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    Breaking in a gun also involves wear along consistent dimensions between the moving parts. That is what contributes to increasingly smooth functioning. By thoroughly cleaning every range trip, you promote that higher-quality break-in.
     
  14. Think1st

    Think1st Supporting Member

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    I don't follow the specified cleaning guidance. I have an aversion to putting away any gun with fouling in it.