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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Saw this posted over on TheKTOG.

The Firearms Blog video interview of Kel Tec founder and designer, George Kelgren.


Spoilers:
5:15
TFB asks, "...are there any plans to possibly bring back the P11? Resurrect it? Update it?"
Kelgren, "Not the P11. Something way better."

Peace favor your sword,
Kirk
 

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At this point I think the market would snatch up an updated Tec-9, he seemed disinterested in discussing the Tec-9 when James brought up Kellgren's earlier designs.

Keltec is an interesting study in the industry because it seems to function as a large R&D lab for the industry and less like a company interested in sustaining products the market wants. They make a lot of really cool stuff, but never in numbers needed to meet demand (not including the P32, P3AT, and P11 pistols). More over, they seem to cease manufacture of firearms that still have a market to move on to the next thing. They're a lot like the opposite of Ruger. Ruger does some, but not much, in the way of actual innovation, but they make a ton of what the market is asking for and they do it in numbers that largely keep the market supplied (the exception being the Deerfield and .32 Single Actions - for which there always seems to be an extremely active secondary market).
 

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I think the guy in charge gets bored easily; and I think he doesn't like to invest in maintaining and updating the tools and machines to produce things. Once the equipment used to make a specific gun start producing out of spec parts, he just pulls the plug on it and puts the resources into producing the newest toy.
My guess anyway.
 

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I think the guy in charge gets bored easily; and I think he doesn't like to invest in maintaining and updating the tools and machines to produce things. Once the equipment used to make a specific gun start producing out of spec parts, he just pulls the plug on it and puts the resources into producing the newest toy.
My guess anyway.
Yeah, maybe just ADHD or something. You're right, with very few exceptions, it seems like maybe they crank out each design until the tooling wears out then quit. It's funny, Raven Arms produced more or less the same model die cast pistol from around 1970 to around 1991, with a few mechanical and aesthetic variations along the way. Keltec burns through designs like toilet paper.

The FFL and factory would offer an extremely tempting opportunity to make all of your own personal gun dreams come true though.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
I think the guy in charge gets bored easily; and I think he doesn't like to invest in maintaining and updating the tools and machines to produce things. Once the equipment used to make a specific gun start producing out of spec parts, he just pulls the plug on it and puts the resources into producing the newest toy.
My guess anyway.
They're still making the P32, P3AT, and PF9. The P32 has been in production since 1999.

Peace favor your sword,
Kirk
 

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They're still making the P32, P3AT, and PF9. The P32 has been in production since 1999.

Peace favor your sword,
Kirk
I had mentioned the P32 and P3AT in my first response as being exceptions. To that point though, I kind of wonder how the P3AT does in terms of sales, I never see them in stock anywhere and the LCP is, in my opinion, both a better firearm and readily available in the market.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I had mentioned the P32 and P3AT in my first response as being exceptions. To that point though, I kind of wonder how the P3AT does in terms of sales, I never see them in stock anywhere and the LCP is, in my opinion, both a better firearm and readily available in the market.
I see them on occasion but they don't last long. I think it probably means they sell pretty much every one which is put under the glass.

I'm betting the new LCP MAX cuts into that a bit. It looks like a superior option.

As for what Kel Tec's new whatsits is going to be, I'm speculating that they were planning on announcing/releasing at the (now canceled) NRA Convention. Or maybe at next SHOT. But I hope they won't wait for anything and just release it as soon as it's ready instead of holding it back for an arbitrary date.

Peace favor your sword,
Kirk
 
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They're still making the P32, P3AT, and PF9. The P32 has been in production since 1999.

Peace favor your sword,
Kirk
Yes...but those are little plastic guns with a minimum of metal parts, I doubt the machinery wears out too fast.
They may also be the exceptions...they make enough money that it's worth it to buy or make new tooling.
 
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Yes...but those are little plastic guns with a minimum of metal parts,
Which describes pretty much all of KT handguns. And almost every manufacturer's handguns, for that matter. ;D

Peace favor your sword,
Kirk
 

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Which describes pretty much all of KT handguns. And almost every manufacturer's handguns, for that matter. ;D

Peace favor your sword,
Kirk
Sure...NOW.
But the shotguns and rifles have a LOT more sophisticated shapes and more moving parts....
 
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Discussion Starter · #11 · (Edited)
Sure...NOW.
But the shotguns and rifles have a LOT more sophisticated shapes and more moving parts....
I haven't looked at an exploded diagram or parts list of, say, the RDB for example, but I bet it's still less than a Ruger GP100 revolver. That's a lot of parts!

Now I gotta go look. BRB...

[edit]
I couldn't find the parts count quickly for the RDB, but I did find a quick parts count for the Sub-2000. Current model subby has 76 parts. About the same as the GP100 and fewer than an AR15, which has about 100 parts but is still considered an easy rifle to manufacture.

Peace favor your sword,
Kirk
 

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It’s not the number of parts, it’s how they fit and work together.
 
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Great interview. I always wondered about what he might be like in person. I agree with the thought that he just likes to make new designs. He's a very bright man with a head full of ideas and likes to make new things. Its what drives him. I have read that he is very careful with money and doesn't go into debt to expand too much too quickly. Makes good business sense.
 

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Great interview. I always wondered about what he might be like in person. I agree with the thought that he just likes to make new designs. He's a very bright man with a head full of ideas and likes to make new things. Its what drives him. I have read that he is very careful with money and doesn't go into debt to expand too much too quickly. Makes good business sense.
I worked for a local foundry that uses that NO DEBT scheme to good effect. It's closing in on a 120 year legacy and always profitable
 

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I think the guy in charge gets bored easily; and I think he doesn't like to invest in maintaining and updating the tools and machines to produce things. Once the equipment used to make a specific gun start producing out of spec parts, he just pulls the plug on it and puts the resources into producing the newest toy.
My guess anyway.
Well, being in industry (and most recently in manufacturing) if he did indeed think this way, I would definitely think he is an idiot, which is clearly not the case. Likely if it was the case, Kel-Tec would already be bankrupt.

Maintenance and updates are at least an order of magnitude cheaper than new tooling and machinery. Your "paid for" running equipment is making you a good profit (usually)
 
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