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So what are YOU doing to prep for this next Great Depression.. which just might be knocking on our doors.
 

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Been stocking up on food, coffee(gotta have it), some water, money in the safe & extra ammo.
We are also getting gear together that can be used if power goes out & we have no heat or use of the stove.
Getting prepped for about 3 months of bad times is about the best we can do right now. If we get a bigger place we could store more but until then we will prepare the best we can.
 

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The power and water won't go out, at least for quite a while. If basic services are disconnected the people revolt. The government will do everything it can to prevent this. At least in the major cites.

Money's not gonna do you any good unless its pre 1964 coinage. Then it contains actual silver.

Me, I got rice, beans, coffee, sugar, yeast, canned chicken, salt, water, lots of books, beef and chicken bullion and lots of spices to make sure the same gruel day in day out doesnt drive me batty, and a couple musical instruments. And lets not forget the aptly named "Big Box o'Liberty". (pictured below)

 

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Ok, now I have to say something:

The US will NOT...I repeat...NOT see anything like the great depression again. Yes, the economy can go MUCH further down, and yes, it can get ALOT worse, but we are FAR away from a true Depression.

And there are PLENTY of good reasons for it.

First off, there will ALWAYS be infastructure because, unlike in the 1920's when nearly all power, water and transport companies were privately owned by a few wealthy corporates, they are divided between co-ops, corporations on a multi-national level, and various state and federal governments. This means while one goes bankrupt, by the law of averages one will do well. It's not like the banking industry: People need water, power and a way to get from A to B. Because it's a concrete product (unlike securities or stocks), the producer of these goods and services can price them accordingly and cut costs to do so. Yeah, it might not be to the quality or quantity we may LIKE, but they'll be there. In the 1920's, when the power company ran out of funds, that was it. You didn't have a power infastructure. You had THE "power company", and when they pulled the plug, it's not like you could go elsewhere. They were the only ones and they even charged you to put a line directly to your house using their cable.

When you look at a city like, say, Phoenix, there are two major power companies that serve the valley: APS, and SRP. Both are a corporate structure with state funding, and service different houses and buisnesses in the same region. Granted it would be a struggle, but one could easily connect a region of a town or neighbourhood to their network if for some reason the other guy failed, and keep the lights on. They also employ many different power sources. In this state we've actually got a leg up on the "green" movement since we're nearly totally powered by carbon neutral systems: Nuclear, hydroelectric and solar. This gives us options that they did not have in the 1920's, and we're not the only state that does so. Thank the WPA back in the day to ensure that such events like what happened in the South and in the "dust bowl" never happen again.

Same thing for many cities when it comes to water and transport systems. Again, one of the many bennies of the WPA and their roads program, along with the deregulation of the trucking industry.

So, we're smarter in the infastructure department. What about manufacturing?

Well, it's true that we no longer build as much stuff in the US as there was in, say, the 1970's, but that's not to say we're hurting in that department either. Believe it or not, the average "DIY"er has more equipment at his or her disposal than could've ever been dreamed of by our forebearers. This is also true for many small buisnesses. Now, it's true that the megacorps have shoehorned alot of that biz out of the US, and much of our manufacturing has gone overseas, but the US still holds a GREAT ability to industrialize on a cottage and small-industry level moreso than any other nation save for Canada, strongly follwed by some of the Baltic states like Poland and Russia. Take a ten-house radius, and I can assure you that you will find someone with a plasma cutter, a metal lathe, an English wheel, and probably a CNC machine and some more obscure stuff. Many Americans have had the time to persue hobbies such as cycle building, rocketry, custom computer building and the like. The wealth of industry ability in the US really IS staggering, but unknown because it's all for the "hobbyist", and the US economic structure doesn't even take that into account.

So we have manufacturing down once it is simply organized. Groovy.

I won't even TOUCH on the financial market, considering it's now a global network, and no matter what, there WILL be currency and the ability to transfer it. Will it be worth as much as it is now? Probably not, BUT, there will be a structure to transfer, manage and allocate wealth that was NOT there in the 1920's, and this is where the economy totally failed. Many people don't realize that the ability to move money, no matter how much it's worth, trumps the actual money itself. Not making sense? Let me break it down.

Take....Zimbabwe.... for example. Right now their economy is in ruins, because their currency has tanked. This is because of a vast restructuring of their government that has led to a feeling of no confidence in the infastructure. By American nature, this is unlikely considering that many are from a very young age ingrained with the ideas of the Constitution being the groundwork for our country, and that if all else fails, we default to this. Even our troops do not take an oath to a flag, a president or a nation, but the Constitution. It might be a little piece of paper, but mentally that does so much.

But, that cannot restore faith in a nation's GDP or currency that draws it's gauge off of that product. Soon, a loaf of bread or a litre of fuel now costs 10 times what it did a week ago. And, without currency to pay for it, it becomes unobtainable. Who carries around thousand dollar bills? So, without hard currency, they resort to barter. The currency then becomes a mental icon of the failure of the state, and no one uses it. Now the nation HAS no currency. And, the banks don't have a centralized network to transfer wealth at all, relying on the hard currency method. What's worse: Each bank issues it's own form of Check and promissory note. Some other banks might accept it, but they don't have to, and other banks have never accepted the notes of others. This fragmented system falls apart when each bank is worried about protecting their own accounts. So, when a relative writes you a note to deposit in your account to help you get by, the bank may or may not acknowledge it as a form of real cash. If they don't, you're screwed no matter how many zeros are on the end of that.

Same thing happened in the 1920's in the US. Currency became worthless as a physical item, and banks were savings and loans, where the community was the market and the auto, mortgage and personal loans from that bank were the securities it held. The check system was just the same: Some banks were on good terms, and some wouldn't give it space on their desk.

Fast forward to today: All banks use one major network in the US to communicate deposits and transactions. Many bank branches only carry enough cash for customer withdraws up to a certain point. If you needed to withdraw, say, $400,000 from a local branch at a grocery store kiosk, forget it. They simply don't keep that much cash on hand. BUT, if you need to transfer it from your bank to your daughter's bank account in Georgia, and you're in Vancouver, this is no problem.

What makes that online currency any different? In truth, it isn't. BUT, it will always be accepted no matter what bank is on the other end of that line, and if there is an assessed value put INTO the account, it will be treated as every other value. Now, this won't make your dollar worth more, but it means you can use the dollars you have ANYTIME, anywhere as long as the bank you are sourcing from is functioning. And, given basic economics, there will always be at least ONE bank in the world still functioning, and if all others fail, that one bank becomes the default and buys into the rest of the system. While the currency is ultra inflated, the rich will still have currency VALUES to put into it, thus keeping the financial network alive. It's a universal system that is established and functions all over the world, and the US is tied into it. There is a HUGE difference between not having any money and having no way to get or spend the money you do have, and that's what seperates us from the 1920's on the financial end.

Food is a tricky one since it is tied into our transportation infastructure, so that COULD be the straw that breaks the camel's back. There are already food shortages in many parts of the world, and this is the one element that I could see causing the US problems beyond a Depression, but this would be more of an epidemic level and not a financial level. If food shortage occurs, then you will see a FAR different model than an Economic Depression.

Riots: Humans are funny creatures. Look at the 1920's. Rough stuff...BUT, there wasn't a revolt. Why? I mean, the people had all sorts of motive to. Before the New Deal, the government was paralyzed. They had no direction and no answer to give the public. They didn't have ANY control of the stock market at that time, and no insurance bailouts to call on to soften the blow of crashes. But, while there was violence, it was FAR less than in other times during US history.

Simply put: They knew it was a problem ALL OVER. Yes, there is plenty of finger pointing that can go on, but after a while it gets tiring holding that finger out at whoever you think caused the problem, and at some point people decided to just get up and do something about it. It was obviously not going to fix itself.

And, aside from all the cynicism and false impressions each social caste has of the other, humans really haven't changed. Nope. Think they have? Look at countries that have REALLY suffered economic and political collapse. And no...I'm not talking the US. We are nowhere NEAR economic or political collapse like many would like to think. Somollia, Ethiopia, Russia, N. Ireland, Poland, former Yugoslavia. THAT is what a total "Depression" looks like in modern times. Some have failed because of government, most because of war. Some have recovered, and some have not. But, in all of those countries, when you look at the fighting it's been because of a war: Religious, political or territorial. You peel away the war, or look at countries such as Belfast during the embargos in the late 70's and early 80's, or Russia in the '90's, and you won't find riots in the streets. You find people who simply got up, started up a cottage industry or a soup kitchen, and went about FIXING things, because they knew they had to. Simple as that. Sort of a social assistance reflex that we're all bred with. It's hard to explain, but it occured a TON during the US depression, and will continue if things get real bad.

Sure they'll be some "bad men", but what society doesn't have that. The solution will be alot like you saw in the settlement era in the US and Australia during the early 19th century: It was everything people could do to build a homestead, grow crops and survive the climates. You had a criminal around, society stood up to it and told them how it would be. They refused, they were dealt with in a brisk and efficent manner in order to get back to the work at hand. Very quickly, petty crime wasn't that common, and many "outlaws" that you hear about were actually rather few in number in comparison to the populations, and one was lucky in those days to get caught by the courts than to face the "group morality" of the society.

That is the element that will maintain things, regardless of what may happen.

But there is an interesting element that has developed in the late 20th and early 21st centuries that is unique to our modern society: The desire and want for a total failure of infastructure. It actually now has a clinical name: "Mad Max" syndrome. No kidding... a couple of professors at U of A mapped out the psycological matrix for it. It's often times found in working or lower classes that desire to see the current form of society or government fall to the wayside out of an inability to function comfortably within it. It's been attributed to the host of issues that plauged folks like the Unabomber and David Korresh. To a lesser extent, it's latent in many other people. They actually get excited when a national dissaster or civil unrest is reported. They plot on how they're going to structure out every detail of their life "after the event" and many insist on showing up those who are "not prepared", instead of figuring out how to maintain the society they live within. They consider themselves superior to everyone around them, instead of being supportive to the community when trouble does occur.

Now, this isn't to say that everybody who maintains a fallout shelter or has a BOB has Mad Max syndrome. Quite the contrary: The prepared are often the ones helping others to evacuate during a hurricane. They're also the ones who are members of the Red Cross or National Guard, ready to give up what THEY have to save others. They help others prepare, and always have that plan "after" the event on how to get life back to "normal" (i.e., starting up the family shop, rebuilding the homestead, storing and securing that '71 Crist Craft boat until after the hurricane passes).

But, we all know the ones that push it over the line, and those who have that mentaility that isn't "quite" there, but secretly live for the moment that THEY will be proven right when society falls down. These are the ones that seem to want the failure, and insist that society will never be able to handle it....well....nobody in society but themselves of course.

That I think is the biggest flaw in the current structure: The society we have today is nothing like the 1920's environment that led to the Great Depression, and the ability to maintain infastructure and communications (because you can NOT stop the internet. You don't need landlines, major servers or even constant power. If you have a wireless broadcast device of ANY type and a computer with power, you can get online!) keeps us on that edge. The biggest hinderance beyond food is the people themselves.

And I think that's a problem we have all created ourselves.

But, a 2nd Great Depression? I think not. What it WILL be? I have no idea.... but I can assure you it will be in a form that nobody has ever seen before. Could we be "bought out" like a megacorp by another superpower? Could mass migration OUT of the US occur? Could another world war break out, spurring the nation to industry like in WWII, saving the industry of the US? All are possible....

And then again we could have our first encounter with alien life and then ALL bets are off.

We just really don't know. But we do know that the problems of before have been addressed. We just have to be on the lookout for new ones that never existed before.
 

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Neo, thanks for the insight and staying positive. We all need that kind of reality check.

As for aliens landing, I bet they "taste like chicken." :lol:

Take Care down there and Stay Safe.
 

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Neo, thanks for the insight and staying positive. We all need that kind of reality check.

As for aliens landing, I bet they "taste like chicken." :lol:

Take Care down there and Stay Safe.
I wonder if Alien would taste good with Old Bay seasoning... as I believe Old Bay seasoning can make just about anything taste better (read:edible).
 

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Ok, now I have to say something:

snip
Thanks for sucking all the fun out of the apocalypse. :p

Sometimes I think that people would rather things just totally collapsed then just a good ol' fashion depression or panic that can be turned around.
 

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Ok, now I have to say something:

snip
Thanks for sucking all the fun out of the apocalypse. :p

Sometimes I think that people would rather things just totally collapsed then just a good ol' fashion depression or panic that can be turned around.
Good point.

I mean, with the Great Depression, it too MASSIVE amounts of time, energy, money and labour to turn things around, and it was only the threat of war and the rush to industrialization that really brought the US out of it (hell of a solution if you ask me...).

That's alot of effort, and no small bit of intimidation.
 

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Hate to argue with ya Neo but if the Stock Market crashes we WILL have another Depression [only the political wingbats will call it a recession] With NO monwyt coming in No power, water, sewer. Yes some untilities are city owned but many are private companies with aggreemants and charters from municipalities If they don't get the money they don't have to serve.

Oh and we will have fighting in the street over the haves against the have nots [we got too many gangs for this not to happen now ]

Stock Market fails, Banks fail, Companies fail, people are unemployed, Right now in SC you can sign up for unemployement BUT you cannot recieve U-P bennes as the state is out of funds [one of my neighbors just got laidoff and found this out]
 

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My main concern about this whole affair compared to the Great Depression is the change in mindset that Americans have experienced in the past 80 years. Neo is right that when the bottom dropped out in the 20s and 30s, the people did not rise up against the state, or even their neighbors, in any big way. But I believe that had a lot to do with the fact that up to that time, people did not expect the government to do anything for them: the age of government intervention and entitlements had not yet arisen. People were used to doing things for themselves, and, let's face it, the majority of people at that time lived very simply compared to today's standards. Large portions of the population, especially in the South and Appalachia, still did not have electricity or even municipal water supplies. So, they tightened their belts, families pulled together, and they made do. When FDR rolled out the WPA and CCC, a lot of people took advantage of those programs, but a lot of people did not because they were not expecting salvation from the government.

Today, things are different. The current generation has grown up in a society where the government has a much greater role in the average person's life. State regulation, government funding for just about any project you can name, federally mandated redistribution of wealth, government subsidies, tax-breaks (sorry, incentives) for businesses, public welfare programs... the list of ways that the feds dip into your pocket, as well as dole out to the general populace, is endless because new programs are added daily. Americans seem to have this opinion now that they are entitled to a better way of life, and the government is responsible for making that happen (and not just the people who are on the public dole... a lot of Americans seem to have this way of looking at things).

My fear is that if the bottom falls out again, this "somebody owes me" mentality, couple with the "I'm not responsible for my own actions" mindset will lead people to riot and loot on a major scale. I mean, people riot when their favorite sports team loses a big game, what are they going to do when the market collapses and our money is nigh worthless?

It might not happen, and I hope it doesn't. But if it does, I will do my best to be as ready as I can.

Semper Paratus
 

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water, non perishable food such as beans, rice, dry milk, flour, salt, sugar, and fuel. I have enough weapons and have decided to concentrate on the stuff that will keep me and mine alive.
Neither side of my family has ever expected anything out of the gov't during hard times, and I don't either.
 

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gtv said:
My fear is that if the bottom falls out again, this "somebody owes me" mentality, couple with the "I'm not responsible for my own actions" mindset will lead people to riot and loot on a major scale. I mean, people riot when their favorite sports team loses a big game, what are they going to do when the market collapses and our money is nigh worthless?

It might not happen, and I hope it doesn't. But if it does, I will do my best to be as ready as I can.

GTV , you hit the nail on the head !!
There has been so much Gov handouts that some people thank that they deserve what they want and the same people know that the police hands are tied because of their (rights).
Spot
 

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I don't think there will be a depression as bad as the one in the 20's, although i'm sure that there will be mass panic and unrest (atleast in large cities) at some point in the next 10 years. The population is simply too big.

Either way, it's a good idea to be prepared.
 

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I don't think there will be a depression as bad as the one in the 20's, although i'm sure that there will be mass panic and unrest (atleast in large cities) at some point in the next 10 years. The population is simply too big.

Either way, it's a good idea to be prepared.
They don't call it the 'Wood for nothing. There's plenty of folks in Greenville and Anderson to start a large riot if they chose to. Back when the Rodney King incident happened the Greenville County officers had to double up (2 to a car) and were not allowed to go into "Urban Areas" unless they had at least 2 full cars to take. According to a former officer, the first thing they did was shoot out the streetlights and parking lot lights then there were gunshots, gunshots, gunshots, and more gunshots... nobody wound up hurt or killed, but they were keeping the police at bay for many of hours (until daybreak).
 

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US, European, Asian markets..
Chaos and Anarcy are on the horizon.

Be afraid, be very afraid and as prepared as you can be.
 

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US, European, Asian markets..
Chaos and Anarcy are on the horizon.

Be afraid, be very afraid and as prepared as you can be.
The last thing we need is fear and panic. Why fear something you can't do anything about?
 

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I've posted a lot about this on other forums,
I personally believe thsi could get VERY VERY bad.
I hope Neo is right, I really do.
But I think it might be worse than that.
So I live by the saying:
"Hope for the best, and prepare for the worst".
I'll keep all my bases covered, thank ya very much.
 
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If you study the actual process of events leading up to the depression f the 30s you will find that it was not a crash, it was a slide that occurred due to the failure of the government oto step in and take action.

the depression started in the "dust bowl" in '26. The stock market crashed in '29, but the banks did not fail until '34. That happened because the political system had no precident for taking direct action in economic matters.

Today we call it a "bailout", back then they were shouting "why dosen't the government do something?"

and people did rise up against the government and society. There were riots in D.C. and raids on Hoovertowns nationwide. Hundreds were killed by "the powers that be". The communist party became a political force in our nation.

People that fought back violently were labeled criminals, and shot down or placed in prision.

Communities passed laws against "vagrancy" and they filled "county farms" with free slave labor by arresting homeless people for having no visible means of support. ( in GA it was illigal to be caught on the roads without at least $5 in your pocket if you could not show legal residence)

It took WW2 to eliminate the excess labor pool (Nearly a billion deaths world wide) and allow rationing of comodities (if it is not available not being able to afford it is irrelivent) and distruction of surplus inventories so we could ride a 30 year replintishment cycle after the war.

during the "great depression" we had 25% unemployment. People that were working took pay cuts and extended hours to keep their jobs. Prices reflected these reduced wages. This was the era when people worked sun up till sundown for $0.50 and managed to pay their bills and feed their families with it! Unless you had previous debt.

This out of work 1/4 of the nation was viewed as "defective" by those that were still working. No food stamps back then, no welfare, no mercy.

Americans have never failed to turn on one another in times of crisis.

The Great depression also nabbed the award for the highest sucicide rate in our nation's history.
 
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