TRS-32, See All, MI Rail, UTG Quick-Detach Rail

Discussion in 'General Firearms Discussion' started by Think1st, Jan 4, 2015.

  1. Think1st

    Think1st Supporting Member

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    The following is something that I just got done posting to another forum, but I wanted to share it with folks here, too. I hope that it is useful.

    I picked up some packages that I had ordered from PSA, Tandem Kross, Midway and Classic Firearms, yesterday, after returning from holiday travels. Today has been an indoor day, given the fact that the weather is dreary, and I wanted to go through the new toys to inspect and prepare them for future range trips.

    Here is a quick set of first impressions on the Bushnell TRS-32, See All sight, Midwest Industries AR forend Picatinny rail section and the UTG Quick Detach AK-47 rail.

    1)Bushnell TRS-32:

    This was on sale from PSA for $49 and change. It came with a high-rise mount and flip-up lens covers. The mount has a tension screw that firmly mounts it to the top receiver rail and has a 5-MOA dot with 11 brightness settings. The mount puts it at the perfect height for co-witnessing with the PSA flip-up sights that I have mounted on my AR, and the sights align just below the middle point of the scope tube.

    I was able to stabilize the rifle on an ammo box in order to look through the iron sights and then adjust the dot until it appeared on the tip of the front sight. This should have it pretty close to zero when I take it to the range. From there, I put the sights back down so that I could have an unobstructed view of the dot. With the dot set to the lowest brightness setting, I aimed the rifle at some various illuminated incandescent and florescent bulbs, and the lights failed to wash out the dot for the most part. There was one ceiling light that had a frosted glass shroud that intensified the light from the bulb to the point that I did have to turn the knob to setting 4 in order to overcome the brightness.

    The initial impression is that this sight will certainly be effective in the brightest outdoor environments. Click adjustments for the zeroing are positive, and the adjustment dials have caps that cover the dials.

    2) See All Sight:

    This was from Tandem Kross for $94. I bought it to use on either my AK-47 or SU-16. Right now, though, I have it mounted on the AK, as I still like my SU-16 in its light-weight minimalist configuration with just its Tec Sight.

    This little 2 1/4" x 1" x 1" block of metal and plastic has a green photo-transmitting plastic block with a reticle on it, along with a lens that magnifies that reticle. It slides onto Picatinny rails and locks down via a pair of set screws that are tightened with an included allen wrench. It also has a second allen wrench for adjusting for windage and elevation.

    After mounting it forward on my AK, I did some quick test presentations, and the reticle quickly comes into view through the magnifier lens. As the attached photo shows, the triangle has a pair of horizontal lines that are perpendicular to the triangle's vertical axis. It is used by simply putting the tip of the triangle on the target and requires no alignment of anything else.

    According to the instructions, the best way to use the sight is to align those horizontal lines with the top edge of the lens, thereby preventing the green photo-transmitting block from obscuring any more of the target than necessary. If shooting with one eye closed, at a very distant target, it probably would be similar to having the lower half of the target cut off by the horizontal structures of a notched rear sight; this is probably why the instructions recommend aligning those horizontal lines with the top edge of the lens. Nevertheless, wherever the tip of the triangle is touching, the rifle is aimed at that point. The triangle does not have to be centered in the lens and is treated the same as the dot in a red dot scope.

    With that in mind, I kept both eyes open while doing my test presentations. In theory, even if the horizontal lines are lower in the lens, the ghost image of the triangle reticle, superimposed over the target, should indicate point of impact. That will be something that I will test during a future trip to the range with it.

    My initial impressions are that it is a solid little piece of innovation that should provide near-red-dot-like target acquisition speeds, while also allowing the eyes to focus on the target, instead of a front sight, thereby reducing eye fatigue and making it easier for people with vision problems to shoot at longer distances without using bulky scopes or battery-consuming illuminated dots. If I like this enough, I may go ahead and get another to have available for my SU-16, too.

    3) Midwest Industries AR Forend Picatinny Rail Section:

    This came from Midway for $19.50. It is a simple 4" section of Picatinny rail with three holes through which one screws it into the existing holes on AR forends. It uses flattened backup bolts that go under the heat shield and allen-head screws that go through the rail's mounting holes. The rail's holes all aligned with the forend holes with no problems and when everything was screwed down, it was a rock-solid modification.

    I put this on my AR so that I could have a place to put a sling swivel and either a light mount or bipod. Not having any of those items at this point, I actually used the TRS-32 mount just to test the rail's dimensions. After tightening the mount onto the rail, it was solid, so I am certain that any other items I mount to it in the future will fit properly.

    4) UTG Quick-Detach AK-47 Rail:

    This came from Classic Firearms for just $30. It slides onto the side rail that some AK-47s have on the left side of the receiver and has a lever that tightens it down with just a 180-degree throw. The mount has a Picatinny rail on top and one mounted 90 degrees to the left. When first mounting it, one slides it forward on the receiver rail until it stops, with the lever in the open position. From there, a screw adjusts the mount's starting tension. The key is to not over-tighten it the first time, lest the screw end up stripping out when the lever gets thrown into the locked position. It only took one minor adjustment to find the right tension, and when I through the lever, it locked solid.

    I unlocked and removed, then attached and re-locked the mount a few times, and it seems that it will return to the same position each time, thereby allowing its removal for weapon transport in a case or maintenance. I actually mounted the See All sight to the mount and have them stored, as a single unit, inside of a small MTM dry box to keep them safe for the range trip.

    When I test it later, I will remove and reattach the mount (after zeroing the See All) to see just how consistent the attachment is from one time to the next.

    Conclusions:

    I do not regret purchasing any of the items above. Each one will certainly enhance the utility of any rifles, and I would recommend them to anyone else. Hopefully, this little rundown will help anyone either on the fence about purchasing any of these items or considering new equipment to fill the roles that these do.
     

    Attached Files:

  2. Bull

    Bull Just a Man Supporting Member

    I looked at the see all video someone posted on here... I'll admit it's intriguing. Definitely give us a range report
     

  3. Think1st

    Think1st Supporting Member

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    I can't wait to do it!
     
  4. Bull

    Bull Just a Man Supporting Member


    The videos definitely made it look worth a go..... ImageUploadedByHi-Point Forum1420417801.435003.jpg I've ditched the 4x scope on there, I've got no prior experience with the carry handle peep sights till I bought this gun, but I can hit my steel plates at 100 yards with em.... Was wanting to go with a lower profile red dot/holo sight for quicker shooting... I've tried a medium sized red dot, don't care for it, as the gun gets pretty tall... These look pretty cool.
     
  5. Think1st

    Think1st Supporting Member

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    A little 4x scope like that one could come in handy if you get a chance to try longer ranges than what are available at the ranges where I shoot. What kind is that one?
     
  6. Bull

    Bull Just a Man Supporting Member


    Leapers, I think, it was used, and the adjustments don't seem to work right.. I'm getting ready to put some bigger glass on my .308, so I'm fixing to have a CP 3-9x40 mil dot laying around.... May stick that on there if I get a bug in my butt.
     
  7. Think1st

    Think1st Supporting Member

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    It's disappointing to get an optic that doesn't pan out. I had a 4x Tru Glo that was a true disappointment. When I took it to the range and there was so much play in between clicks, I knew that things weren't going to go well. I shot better groups with my iron sights and have suspicions that the reticule wasn't mounted very solidly inside the tube, so the zero changed from shot to shot.
     
  8. Bull

    Bull Just a Man Supporting Member

    What kind of testicles do the use in Truglo scopes?...
    I can't complain, the scope was a throw in when I bought it.... Lightly used bushmaster upper, new Anderson lower, 300+ rds of 5.56...... Gave 800$ back when the AR prices were still up.
     
  9. Think1st

    Think1st Supporting Member

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    Ah, jeez. I put that in from my new phone, and it thinks that it knows better what to type than I do. I don't know why it changed "reticule."
     
  10. Bull

    Bull Just a Man Supporting Member


    Lol..... I figured..... Just bustin your reticules!....