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I was doing some looking around at custom color work for my 995TS and I was wondering if anyone had ever tried doing a water transfer printing onto the stock or the whole gun.

I can see the whole gun would be a issue as the moving parts and other issues but I would think if you did the pieces separately that at most you may have to do some trim work around say the bolt and receiver area just to make sure they moved freely.

I would think you could get some interesting designs done this way. Has anyone tried it?

For those who are not sure what this is, check out
 

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ROLL wif Da MOLE!
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I saw it done once on youtube, but the video is really worth watching! :D
 

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I did the home made $1.95 version using enamel spray paint and a pan of warm water on my CF-380 slide.
 

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I did the home made $1.95 version using enamel spray paint and a pan of warm water on my CF-380 slide.
Please explain.. I'm assuming (you know what you get) that you sprayed the paint on top of a tub of water and dunked you gun. But please explain your process!

PS: Your gun looks good and really unique!
 

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Please explain.. I'm assuming (you know what you get) that you sprayed the paint on top of a tub of water and dunked you gun. But please explain your process!

PS: Your gun looks good and really unique!
Yes, please explain! Love how that came out. :cool:

btw, I've noticed many of your pistols have wood grips, do you make your own?
 

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Please explain.. I'm assuming (you know what you get) that you sprayed the paint on top of a tub of water and dunked you gun. But please explain your process!
Well lucky you I once wrote a tutorial when I did it to a model of a 62 Bel-Air named "Sunset".

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Materials used / needed:

5 gal. Bucket
Plastic Trash Bag
Wire Coat Hanger
Paper Towels
Paint Stirrer, ruler, long spoon, anything to stir a large amount of water.
Enamel spray cans of various colors.
(Using Enamel for the dip process is a must as it's the only paint that works properly. I also suggest using rattle cans as an airbrush is more of a pain than it's worth and you need to work quickly.)

Before we begin I suggest you forget everything you know about proper body painting. It doesn't apply here. I will be telling you to do things that will make you scratch your head and call me a nut job, but trust me, it will work out in the end.

Let's start with your chosen victim. In this case it was an AMT 62 Bel Air with the trim shaved off and all edges rounded. The smoother the body the easier it will go. I'm sure you could use a fully trimmed 63 Chrysler Imperial, but I wouldn't want to try it. It needs to be primed (flat white works best) and ready for paint with all body panels (hood, trunk, etc.) tack glued into place. A small amount of rubber cement works great. 5 min epoxy will also do in a pinch. Do not use white glue or tape. You'll be submerging it in warm water and the results won't be pretty.

Next bend the coat hanger into a make shift body stand / handle. It needs to fit inside the body, hold the body firmly in an inverted (upside down) position, and allow you to fully submerge the body in water while keeping your hand dry. Set the body / hanger combo aside.

Line the 5 gal. bucket with the trash bag and fill 3/4 to 4/5 full with warm water. (from here on it helps to have a second person helping you). Stir the water to get a pretty rapid whirlpool going. With a different color paint can in each hand (two colors at once will give a better pattern than one) spray simutanious split second bursts into the swirling water. (And I do mean *split second*. You want to use the absolute smallest amount of paint imaginable. You will not believe how much coverage you'll get.) Let the paint swirl for a second or two till you see a pattern that grabs you. If you don't like what you see forming or you waited too long (must dip in the first few seconds or the paint wont grab properly) it's no big deal. Just wipe the paint off the surface of the water with a paper towel and try again. Once you have a pattern you like, completely submerge the body (upside down) into the bucket through the paint. Do Not Lift It Yet. Using a paper towel, wipe any excess paint off the surface of the water and remove any "paint strands" floating off the body. Once satisfied with the clean up process lift the body out of the water. Blot it dry and lightly burnish the paint down with a paper towel. Yes you can burnish it right away as it will only be slightly tacky. Repeat the dip process as many times it takes with whatever colors you want till you're pleased with the final result. When done clean up is a breeze. Just poke a hole in the bottom of the trash bag to drain the water and throw the bag away.

"Sunset" was done in 3 dips using Testers Emerald Green Metallic, Testers Ruby Red Metallic, and Testers Saphire Blue Metallic. IIRC the combos were blue/green, blue/red, and red/green. after the last dip was blotted dry and burnished I airbrushed a coat of laquer gloss lightly tinted with some fuscha colored Pactra RC pearl paint to give it that blended pinkish look. The eagle "decal" on the hood is actually one of those high quality temporary body tattoos you see at music stores like Strawberries. It was used to cover a screw up on the hood more than an enhancement, but it turned out for the best. After letting it set up for a few days it was just a case of several gloss coats (so many I lost count) and a ton of rubbing and polishing. It took more gloss coats to cover/smooth the tattoo than it did to cover/smooth the enamel.

If you're going to try a dip job a try I highly suggest practicing with a test body before dipping your prized project. It's very easy to over estimate the amount of paint you need to spray upon the water and too much paint will yield a crappy dip.
 

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ROLL wif Da MOLE!
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So I see that you used many colors and layered/staggered them on the surface of the water... along with multiple dips.
Could this be done with a pan of still water and make your own patterns, maybe?
 

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So I see that you used many colors and layered/staggered them on the surface of the water... along with multiple dips.
Could this be done with a pan of still water and make your own patterns, maybe?
I've tried different ways. Swirling just yields the best results. The CF-380 was 1 dip with 2 shades of light brown over a tan base. No gloss coats.
 
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