What’s up with this weather?

Discussion in 'Lounge' started by mr_flintstone, Jun 13, 2019.

  1. mr_flintstone

    mr_flintstone Supporting Member

    Here in eastern KY, we usually have about 40 some inches of precipitation per year, and the avg June temps are in the upper 80s. Last year we passed 80 inches of precipitation, and we’ve already passed 40 for this year. So far this year, we’ve only had a handful of days that have broken the 85 degree mark. Yesterday the high was 70, and right now the thermometer sits at 62 degrees and partly sunny. Anybody else having funky weather?
     
    RickC likes this.
  2. Bertus

    Bertus Member

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    yes, the smelt were a week late running this year, waited an extra 2 weeks to plant the garden, lots of snow last winter and rain this spring.
     

  3. SWAGA

    SWAGA No longer broke... Lifetime Supporter

    No global warming, move right along now sheeple.
     
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  4. Bertus

    Bertus Member

    2,780
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    no climate change going on here...
    I seen they found a wolf head come out of the permafrost in Siberia this week, it was 40000 years old

    [​IMG]
     
  5. Dane

    Dane Supporting Member

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    I heard the St. Louis arch was controlling the weather
     
    Taildragger likes this.
  6. SDProf

    SDProf Supporting Member

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    Weather seems to be a bit whackier than usual here in the Black Hills. Way more precip than usual for May, with a big snowstorm to boot. Temps are up and down like a roller coaster.
     
  7. 200 years ago a bunch of guys were sitting around the general store talking about how unusual the weather had been lately.

    And I forgot. This time of year is "global warming" season. My favorite!
    I'm not a big fan of that dang "climate change" season that starts around October, but I'll survive it. Again.
     
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  8. Think1st

    Think1st Supporting Member

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    Seriously. Those global warming pushers love to take photos in front of bare rock peaks in the summertime and compare it to a wintertime photo from 60 years earlier to show how global warming made all the ice melt.
     
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  9. mr_flintstone

    mr_flintstone Supporting Member

    All I know is that I’m really saving on my A/C bill this summer.
     
    Twisty and adam01364 like this.
  10. And place temperature sensors in the middle of blacktop parking lots in July and proclaim "Oh my, look how much hotter it is! We've got to do something to save the earth."
     
    Rerun and Think1st like this.
  11. SWAGA

    SWAGA No longer broke... Lifetime Supporter


    [​IMG]
     
  12. TNTRAILERTRASH

    TNTRAILERTRASH Supporting Member

    Talking with a friend yesterday broke down in Pete Whirlygig's town of South Bend. 47* and raining! It was 48* here at 4am when I got home from work. ;)
     
    Rerun likes this.
  13. moona11

    moona11 King of you Monkeys Lifetime Supporter

    Rain do you need it[​IMG][​IMG]
     
  14. mr_flintstone

    mr_flintstone Supporting Member

    RAIN!! We don’t need no stinkin’ rain!

    I got plenty. I’ve been needing to bale hay for over a month, but I can’t get three days of sun in a row.
     
    ratchowmein likes this.
  15. TNTRAILERTRASH

    TNTRAILERTRASH Supporting Member

    Got rain coming tomorrow night, and more next week.
     
  16. ajole

    ajole Supporting Member

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    We’ve been getting thunderstorms almost every day recently, they usually happen later in the summer, but it’s making haying tough now. One lightning bolt hit a tree at the lake at a primitive camp area, and fried the boat tied to it, not sure if the strike followed the rope or what, but the bow nav light was exploded, and the engine caught fire. The guy had just put the boat in the water, motored over, storm started so he got the kids out and into the camper, and boom.

    They issued a flood warning for the river through town here, but it would only affect those that built their houses too close to the water. There are a few of them. But they are sucking as much water out at the diversion above town into the reservoir as they can, the issue is, they are also dumping the water into the other river that joins the flooded river below town...so they can help the people along that 5 miles of the river, but there’s not much they can do for anyone else.
     
  17. OldOutlaw

    OldOutlaw Supporting Member

    Still raining most of the time here. Big thunderstorm just passed over a bit ago. Probably got the better part of another inch. This ground has been totally saturated for so long that the water tables are up to grass level in numerous places. I am hearing of basement walls one after another are caving in.

    Two gentlemen at the range Tuesday said theirs had. One 6 weeks ago and the other's on last Sunday. They told me that in this Metro Area of 400,000 that no help is available to fix them either. That there are so many that all contractors are booked solid for weeks to come. All they can do is buy pumps and try to pump out water as fast as it comes in. These guys are about 125 to 150 feet above river level. Ground is just that wet.

    My back yard is a good 75 feet higher than the front yard. Up there, I have not been able to mow all Spring so far. There is 1 to 2 inches of water just sitting on top of the ground. Grass is flat dead in some areas up there. Two weeks ago, I went up on the mower to see how wet it was. Drove on a normal dry area of grass. Sank right in up to the axles and mower deck in seconds. In 32 years here, I have never seen any thing like this.
     
  18. ajole

    ajole Supporting Member

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    That’s amazing. I can’t imagine that, we are so dry up on the cobble rock bench where I live, that an hour after it rains, you can’t tell it did, it just drains out. There is no water table worth talking about, people have to truck in water if they aren’t on the system.
     
  19. OldOutlaw

    OldOutlaw Supporting Member

    Below ground here is solid Limestone. Above is many feet of Clay. On top of that is black dirt. Geologists say the clay is so wet the water cannot get into the limestone fissures below it. When wet, this clay swells up and water will not go through it. Same clay as landfills used to compact wet to make the bottom of a landfill hold water in.