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The carbine ran the best it has so far with the new mags, but I was still getting failure to pick up a round and eject. I'm thinking the mags need some tweaking or it's the South Korean ammo I have. Not sure how old the ammo is, there's no rust of corrosion on any of the rnds. Maybe I need to pick up a different brand and try it out.
Think I may have solved the problem with my AO carbine using the Korean mags.

Take a look at this photo. The "tits" on the rear of the Korean mags are higher than those of the OEM mags, making the Korean mags ride lower in the mag well the the OEM mags, thereby not picking up the rounds like they should. The Korean mag (stamped RO) is on the left:

DSCN0919.JPG


Looking down into the well with the Korean mag inserted, there's about a 1/32 to 1/16" gap between the top of the mag and the top of the well. I can plainly see the difference on the rear of the mags. With the OEM mag inserted, there is no gap.

I was thinking there was too much side-to-side movement but now I'm thinking the Korean mags are dropping/drooping down prohibiting the bolt to pick up the rounds as it should.

Waddya think? I'm not sure what to do to fix it, other than buy more mags, nor have I been to the range to see what I can do (maybe place some tape from the bottom of the mag up onto the sides of the stock).

I put tape on both sides of all the mags to eliminate the side-to-side movement, not sure if I could maybe superglue a piece of brass just under the tits on the Korean mags to make them ride higher or not.
 

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Think I may have solved the problem with my AO carbine using the Korean mags.

Take a look at this photo. The "tits" on the rear of the Korean mags are higher than those of the OEM mags, making the Korean mags ride lower in the mag well the the OEM mags, thereby not picking up the rounds like they should. The Korean mag (stamped RO) is on the left:

View attachment 70651

Looking down into the well with the Korean mag inserted, there's about a 1/32 to 1/16" gap between the top of the mag and the top of the well. I can plainly see the difference on the rear of the mags. With the OEM mag inserted, there is no gap.

I was thinking there was too much side-to-side movement but now I'm thinking the Korean mags are dropping/drooping down prohibiting the bolt to pick up the rounds as it should.

Waddya think? I'm not sure what to do to fix it, other than buy more mags, nor have I been to the range to see what I can do (maybe place some tape from the bottom of the mag up onto the sides of the stock).

I put tape on both sides of all the mags to eliminate the side-to-side movement, not sure if I could maybe superglue a piece of brass just under the tits on the Korean mags to make them ride higher or not.
I also see a huge difference at the top of the Korean mag. Not at all shaped like the OEM mag. Are they similar on the other side of each?
 

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Waddya think? I'm not sure what to do to fix it, .......not sure if I could maybe superglue a piece of brass just under the tits on the Korean mags to make them ride higher or not.
That could work.
Solder maybe.
JB Weld could work too.
 
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I also see a huge difference at the top of the Korean mag. Not at all shaped like the OEM mag. Are they similar on the other side of each?
The shape is closer than the picture suggests, but I may have to look at that too.

That could work.
Solder maybe.
JB Weld could work too.
I was thinking solder a bar across there, or at least 2 small pieces of brass. I do have some JB Weld too.

Mags not being cheap I was hoping to save these if I can. A piece of brass on that rear just may do it.

The 30rnd mag is also Korean, but it sits up high like the OEM mags.
 

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Given the current ammo crisis, I decided that yesterday's range trip would be a good opportunity to get reacquainted with the ol' cap and ball revolver. The previous trips were just shot at paper targets, but I took it to the steel range, yesterday, for the first time. I was impressed.

I picked a lane with a 5" or 6" plate at 15 yards and a 10" plate at 25 yards. I was amazed with the force with which the 30 grains of Pyrodex proppeled the lead balls when I saw how the plates moved under impact. In fact, the small plate kept getting knocked from its mounting hook.

I ran 48 rounds through it in total. I preloaded the two extra cylinders the night before, so I only had to load the installed cylinder when I first got to the line. After I shot three cylinders, I loaded all three, again, before shooting some more. The last two cylinders, I just reloaded the installed cylinder.

Putting lube around the chamber mouths, before ramming the ball, did a good job for keeping the bore fouling down. Having lube follow the ball keeps the fouling soft, so the successive balls push it out of the way, preventing it from building up and filling the rifling. I was still getting hits on the 25 yard target about 50% of the time with rounds 43-48, and I didn't punch the bore once.
 

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My brother had a .36 cal Naval(?) revolver, seems to recall he used Crisco for that. Man, that was back in the 1960s! We blew one of the posts holding up the targets completely away trying to hit the target.
Did you guys put the lube on the chamber mouths after ramming the ball home, or did you put it behind the ball?

I was using Precision Lube. Speaking of your Crisco, though, I mixed up a batch of melted Crisco and bee's wax for use when it gets REALLY hot out so the lube won't end up too soft and run behind the cork wad and into the powder. It was high 70s out, yesterday, so it wasn't hot enough for that stuff.
 

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Did you guys put the lube on the chamber mouths after ramming the ball home, or did you put it behind the ball?

I was using Precision Lube. Speaking of your Crisco, though, I mixed up a batch of melted Crisco and bee's wax for use when it gets REALLY hot out so the lube won't end up too soft and run behind the cork wad and into the powder. It was high 70s out, yesterday, so it wasn't hot enough for that stuff.
My brother and I one shot the 1864 Colt Army revolver my uncle found in my great-great grand father's smoke house. Took a plated .45acp round and and resized it with a hammer and check it with a micrometer. Had to cut a empty shell case with a tubing cutter to place in front of the cylinder. It was so worn out we couldn't get a hard strike on the caps. It placed it rearward enough to work. That thing was fairly accurate at 15yds!
 

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My brother and I one shot the 1864 Colt Army revolver my uncle found in my great-great grand father's smoke house. Took a plated .45acp round and and resized it with a hammer and check it with a micrometer. Had to cut a empty shell case with a tubing cutter to place in front of the cylinder. It was so worn out we couldn't get a hard strike on the caps. It placed it rearward enough to work. That thing was fairly accurate at 15yds!
That's pretty impressive that you were able to get that kind of accuracy when you had to shim it back that far. Imagine how it must have been when it was new! A lot of people don't realize how much accuracy you get from those things.
 

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Did you guys put the lube on the chamber mouths after ramming the ball home, or did you put it behind the ball?

I was using Precision Lube. Speaking of your Crisco, though, I mixed up a batch of melted Crisco and bee's wax for use when it gets REALLY hot out so the lube won't end up too soft and run behind the cork wad and into the powder. It was high 70s out, yesterday, so it wasn't hot enough for that stuff.
I think he put it on after he loaded the cylinder, I recall him saying it was to keep one chamber from igniting one next to it. He was a member of the Izaak Walton Club back then. My daughter gave me this patch last year, don't know how she ended up with it:

izaak walton patch.jpg
 

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I think he put it on after he loaded the cylinder, I recall him saying it was to keep one chamber from igniting one next to it. He was a member of the Izaak Walton Club back then. My daughter gave me this patch last year, don't know how she ended up with it:

View attachment 70911
Yeah, putting grease over the chambers has been a common method of preventing chain fires. I read a very extensive series of blog articles by a guy who talked about chain fires. His theory, tested at length, was that chain fires come from loose powder being "entrained" from the opening of the chamber, between the projectile and back down to the main charge. Sloppy loading was what he said causes it and that entrained powder will still ignite, even when a plug of grease is over the chamber mouth, because the grease won't immediately render the powder inert.

It's an interesting theory. He was the one who also talked about lubing behind the projectile to keep the bore fouling soft.
 

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I think about it every time I watch a youtube video of someone shooting a civil war cannon and swabbing the bore with a swab dampened in water. I doubt artillerymen in the civil war had time to do it after every shot once they started shooting, talk about controlled chaos.
 

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I think about it every time I watch a youtube video of someone shooting a civil war cannon and swabbing the bore with a swab dampened in water. I doubt artillerymen in the civil war had time to do it after every shot once they started shooting, talk about controlled chaos.
I think they had to do that to extinguish any remaining embers so the new powder charge wouldn't ignite as it was loaded. Can you imagine having that go off as you load it? Ouch.
 

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I think they had to do that to extinguish any remaining embers so the new powder charge wouldn't ignite as it was loaded. Can you imagine having that go off as you load it? Ouch.
Yes, the exact reason. Still religiously done today by our local Civil War en-actors.
Their cannon actually is an old Civil War relic. I think it came from the RI Arsenal where it was a fortress gun against any Confederate Navy attempt to attack that vital arsenal at the time. There are actually a number of these old guns around owned now by en-actor groups up here.
 

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That's pretty impressive that you were able to get that kind of accuracy when you had to shim it back that far. Imagine how it must have been when it was new! A lot of people don't realize how much accuracy you get from those things.
We have no idea on the history of the gun. The serial number falls in one of the years where Colt can't verify who it was sold to. Still has the factory walnut grips. The bottom 1/3 of the left grip is missing. My aunt told me we did have a relative that was a Texas ranger. It wasn't "D.O." (name on his granite monument) The top of the left grip has 2 notches o_O

 

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I shot 150 rounds of my reloads on the "Pocket Rocket" and 100 more on the M&P-SE
today.:bounce:

I love the smell of Unique and Power Pistol !!!:thumbsup:
 

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