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I know little or nothing about reloading and I dont even have the time to shoot the ammunition that have saved up but I think it would be very interesting to reload my own ammo. So the question is what is the most simple and inexspensive way to start reloading 9mm with the least ammount of materials and equipment. Thanks for any advice.
 

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Look here: http://www.cabelas.com/prod-1/0003091210526a.shtml

This may not be for you, but it IS the least expensive way to go. Look and read through the Reloading thread and you will find more comments on this Lee reloading kit. I'm awaiting my scale, chamfer tool, and bullets and then I will knocking out 9mm rounds about one per minute. I don't need high volume production, just make back what I use. This kit fits the bill for me and presents and interesting and pleasant challenge, i.e., using nothing but hand tools.
 

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if you want to reload in any volume, move up to a single stage press like this:
http://www.midwayusa.com/viewProduct/?productNumber=423081
http://www.midwayusa.com/viewProduct/?productNumber=140616
but you are going to have to shop around to find one in stock, or buy the items seperatly.

if you just want to load a handfull of rounds at a time the handloader is fine, but it is SLOW to use. if you are OK with that, its the best bang for your buck but eventually you will likely upgrade to a single stage so its more cost effective to start with one if thats where you want to end up anyway.

SW
 

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I use the lee chanlenger sieries press kit.. The quick chucks work real well and saves time plus the kit gives you everything you need other than the die set .. I also recomend the 4-piece carbide set by lee also know as the factory crimp set .. The Lee Turet press does work great if your planing on reloading alot and or just to save some time . Then its just a matter of picking out your primers , powder and bullets ..
 

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Look here: http://www.cabelas.com/prod-1/0003091210526a.shtml

This may not be for you, but it IS the least expensive way to go. Look and read through the Reloading thread and you will find more comments on this Lee reloading kit. I'm awaiting my scale, chamfer tool, and bullets and then I will knocking out 9mm rounds about one per minute. I don't need high volume production, just make back what I use. This kit fits the bill for me and presents and interesting and pleasant challenge, i.e., using nothing but hand tools.
shit, they dont make it for .40 cal :(
 

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+1 on the Lee products. They are not the Cadillac that Dillon is, but they do offer tremendous "bang for the buck".

I would not hesitate to recommend either the Lee 50th anniversary single stage kit, or the Lee Classic Turret to any 'average" shooter. If you are shooting a thousand rounds per week....then a good progressive will be your friend. But 50+ rounds per hour single stage, or 150-200 rounds per hour on the 4-hole turret is no sweat. More than enough speed for me to stay stocked up for range trips in .380/9mm/.45ACP anyway.
 

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Whatever Lee press you decide on will give you great service. Also to save money consider casting your own bullits down the road. With casting and reloading my own 45ACP I spend 3.50 per 50 rounds as opposed to 21.00 per 50 retail.
 

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Look here: http://www.cabelas.com/prod-1/0003091210526a.shtml

This may not be for you, but it IS the least expensive way to go. Look and read through the Reloading thread and you will find more comments on this Lee reloading kit. I'm awaiting my scale, chamfer tool, and bullets and then I will knocking out 9mm rounds about one per minute. I don't need high volume production, just make back what I use. This kit fits the bill for me and presents and interesting and pleasant challenge, i.e., using nothing but hand tools.
shat, they dont make it for .40 cal :(
Wow, I never noticed that!
My shooting buddy has a 9mm and a .38 and is in the process of buying a Hi Point .45! He is pretty excited about starting to learn to reload when my Lee Loader comes in. I suggested to him that since he has 3 different caliber weapons it would make more sense if he bought a press. He said "actually I'm thinking of getting a Lee Loader for .38 using yours for .45 and buying 9mm at Walmart."
 

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Whatever Lee press you decide on will give you great service. Also to save money consider casting your own bullits down the road. With casting and reloading my own 45ACP I spend 3.50 per 50 rounds as opposed to 21.00 per 50 retail.
When I see those kind of numbers quoted I tend to wonder if the person figured in the cost of equipment. Did you?
 

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http://www.midwayusa.com/viewProduct/?productNumber=880135

For the money, you can't go wrong with this press. I have this press and it really works well.
Most of the people I have talked to who have tried the Lee Loader, keep them around for occasional use. So I decided it would be fun to try out while I am learning. If I get really into it I will probably get the press you are talking about, at some point. Perhaps by the time I decide I'm ready, they will be off back order!
 

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Delmar,

Numbers don't lie. I figured all costs. I spent $250 for everything to get going. I'm a good scrounger and get lead for free, save or pickup brass so it is free. Pay $20/lb powder and $33/1K primers. Only cost I have is powder and primer. Works out to $3.50 per box with powder and primer cost. Divide the $250 by the $17.50 a box savings and I'll have paid for the reloading items after 15 boxes. If I sell bullet lead ingots, a few cast bullets or loaded rounds to buddies I'll make a little profit to offset the cost of the reloading items so in the end reloading items will be free. Or base the cost of reloading setup on the lifetime number of rounds that can be reloaded and the cost is less than a fraction of a cent per round.

Even if you bought bullets, instead of casting, reloading is cheaper because the brass is the most expensive part of a round and you can reuse the brass 10X.
 

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I hope I didn't come across as calling you a liar. Just asking if you took that into account. It sounds like you are indeed a good scrounger, as you would have to be, to make your ammo for $3.50 a box!

I watched a youtube video from a guy who said you have to figure your time into your reloading cost. I guess if reloading is not fun for you, you would have to! I know that, if my wife figured her time on her knitting, my stocking cap would have cost about $100!
 

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FWIW, the Lee Basic Loader book that came with their kit states that brass can be reloaded up to 100 times. I'd say it took about $120 to get started in reloading 9mm and that includes 1,000 bullets from the Missouri Bullet Company. I have the basic kit, a new mallet, scale, chamfer tool, case trimmer, funnel, a pound of Winchester 231. Granted, I won't be cranking out shells by the dozen as I don't have a press. That said, I will be able to reload at least 50 rounds per day in my leisure. That comes out to 350 rounds per week, enough to keep me in practice well enough. I'll get a press down the line if the need arises.
 

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FWIW, the Lee Basic Loader book that came with their kit states that brass can be reloaded up to 100 times. I'd say it took about $120 to get started in reloading 9mm and that includes 1,000 bullets from the Missouri Bullet Company. I have the basic kit, a new mallet, scale, chamfer tool, case trimmer, funnel, a pound of Winchester 231. Granted, I won't be cranking out shells by the dozen as I don't have a press. That said, I will be able to reload at least 50 rounds per day in my leisure. That comes out to 350 rounds per week, enough to keep me in practice well enough. I'll get a press down the line if the need arises.
the best ive gotten out of one particular piece of brass is 12 loadings and on the last one the case head seprated. handloader did a test where they loaded and counted shots for average case life and the best was norma with 19 loadings. the worst was blazer with 4. i average 8-9 from pistol brass and 10-12 with lightly loaded rifle calibers.

SW
 

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Only "you" can decide/calculate if reloading will actually save you money. If you go thru 100 rounds per year.....buy it at WalMart.

If you want to learn a new fun, enjoyable, satisfying and 'shooter budget friendly' hobby, reloading is one such hobby. Since reloading will let you shoot more for the same $$, the average shooter will still break even. Competition. high round count shooters will definitely save a lot of cash by rolling their own.

If you don't want to mess with the hobby, stock up on Winchester Whte Box (WWB) - or whatever else is on sale - everytime you pass a box of it on the shelves at your favorite megamart or gun emporium.
 

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FWIW, the Lee Basic Loader book that came with their kit states that brass can be reloaded up to 100 times. I'd say it took about $120 to get started in reloading 9mm and that includes 1,000 bullets from the Missouri Bullet Company. I have the basic kit, a new mallet, scale, chamfer tool, case trimmer, funnel, a pound of Winchester 231. Granted, I won't be cranking out shells by the dozen as I don't have a press. That said, I will be able to reload at least 50 rounds per day in my leisure. That comes out to 350 rounds per week, enough to keep me in practice well enough. I'll get a press down the line if the need arises.
Did you get a caliper yet? If not what is your plan for discerning which cases need trimmed and how much to trim them? Or does the case trimmer trim them to a specified length?

I just realized I keep forgetting to pick up a funnel :(
 

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Delmar,

No offense taken. I was just trying to give a complete answer to your question. I do not count my time reloading since it is my "down time", doing something I enjoy, pondering, and listening to my music and most importantly recharging my batteries.
 

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Did you get a caliper yet? If not what is your plan for discerning which cases need trimmed and how much to trim them? Or does the case trimmer trim them to a specified length?
Yes, the case trimmer has a narrow stem that fits into the priming hole from the top. It screws into the wider case trimmer and trims it down to the exact length needed (if needed) without trimming off too much. The case is locked into a Lee case lock which has an 1/4 inch chuck attachment so the case can be spun. None of the once fired brass that I have required any trimming. Yes, I recommend a caliper to double check everything.
 

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I got a caliper to do ocassional check. From what I've read and been told straight walled pistol cases don't really stretch like necked rifle cases? and checking them is unnecessary? I got one just to be on the safe side.
 
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