What Tacticool accessories did you NOT buy today?

Discussion in 'General Firearms Discussion' started by SWAGA, Oct 21, 2020.

  1. lklawson

    lklawson Staff Member

    I've seen several in which they were riveted to the material. That said, I've also seen cut tests which indicate that they do not tend to dump the plates out of the pockets.

    I actually have an AutoCAD .DWG drawing file of some of the Wisby armor from way back in the day. I distinctly recall scanning in and posting on the Arador Armor Archive three of the types, as well as the Roman "segmentata" armor.

    That said, I think that, in a modern context, lamellar would be better than CoP type armor.

    Peace favor your sword,
    Kirk
     
  2. lklawson

    lklawson Staff Member

    This one is a neat read. WWI body armor.

    Helmets and Body Armor in Modern Warfare
    , Yale University Press, 1920
    https://books.google.com/books?id=6...ce=gbs_ge_summary_r&cad=0#v=onepage&q&f=false
    Chapters:
    • The Early Use of Armor in the Present War
    • Armor as Protections against Missiles of Low and Middle Velocity
    • Statistics which Demostrate the Usefulness of Modern Armor
    • Frequency in the Location of Wounds and its Bearing upon the Armor Problem
    • Foreign Types of Modern Helmets and Body Armor
    • Shields and their Use during teh Present War
    • American Helmets and Body Armor
    • Steel Used in Making Modern Armor Can Other Metal than Steel be Used for this Purpose, e.g., Aluminum Alloys?
    • Soft Armor
    • Concerning Tests

    Here's a section from the "Soft Armor" section:
    "In 1897 a Russian inventor, Casimir Zeglin, working in New York and Chicago, produced a closely woven silk cloth about one quarter inch thick, and of this he prepared a waistcoat which was proof at 80 paces to a 40 caliber revolver, whose bullet was of lead and traveled at teh rate of 400 foot seconds. In a plastron of his woven silk, the inventor faced a firing test successfully and since that time has made numerous experiments in the direction of improving his bullet-proof costume. (Tests of them were made, e.g., at Springfield Arsenal, 1899 and 1904.)"

    Zeglin silken body defense.png
    The American section is neat too:

    Helmets and body armor - lamellar.png Helmets and body armor - american experimental model of sentinels heavy armor.png Helmets and body armor - american light body armor.png Helmets and body armor - american sentinels armor 2.png Helmets and body armor - brewster body armor.png

    Remember this is 1920. WW1.

    Peace favor your sword,
    Kirk
     
    Rabidwookie likes this.

  3. lklawson

    lklawson Staff Member

    The WWI bullet proof Wilkinson Jacket:
    [​IMG] [​IMG]
    Peace favor your sword,
    Kirk
     
    Rabidwookie and Rerun like this.
  4. Rerun

    Rerun Supporting Member

    8,352
    2,815
    That would depend on how the separated lamellar playes are connected - ropes or other soft corsage, I'd say no.

    Wire, oth, would do.

    eldar
     
    Rabidwookie likes this.
  5. Rerun

    Rerun Supporting Member

    8,352
    2,815
    I have an article about bullet proof armour from the Civil War.
    A regiment from Massachusetts was fully equipped with the armour.
    After being called chicken and cat called about their lack of intestinal fortitude (balls) by unarmored units, many soldiers of the Massachusetts regiment removed their protection and threw it into the Potamac River as they marched South.

    Foolish pride.

    eldar
     
    Rabidwookie likes this.
  6. lklawson

    lklawson Staff Member

  7. Rerun

    Rerun Supporting Member

    8,352
    2,815
    lklawson likes this.
  8. lklawson

    lklawson Staff Member

    My concern with any of these, after being able to actually stop a round of course, is spalling. If the lamellar spalled, what would happen? Where would it go? Would a coating, such as is used on the full sized plates, be effective for this?

    A number of "I don't know's" there.

    And, from what I can tell, using a coating to mitigate spalling is a pretty modern standard. The older stuff doesn't seem to think to hard about it. Heck the Wilkinson Jacket appears to be a CoP, which sometimes means gaps.

    Peace favor your sword,
    Kirk
     
    Rabidwookie likes this.