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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just a short story, I went out west to hunt bear, but left my back up gun @ home( a ruger .357). So I am far from home w/just my 7mm and my JH .45 in my truck, so I decide to stick my .45 in my hunting bag.( I know it was to small, sorry). Later that day I shot a bear out of the blind and it charged. I emptied all 3 rounds out of my 7mm, and it was still coming. I started to panic, and drew my hi point, and emptied the clip on it, downing it about 15 yards from me.


That's wht I trust my hi point
 

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That'll pucker your butt.
 

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Got any pics of the bear? I'd like to see that joker!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Lost all my pics when I had water damage to my storage building while I was stationed over seas. Alot of other stuff too. I also collect swords, lost about 4 to major rust, have a gun I need to re blue, lots of baseball cards and comics. It was a bad day. :'(
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
To be honest, the 7mm probably is what actually did the job, but I sure emptied the .45 at him.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
But if you guys would like, I can send some pics of my one rusted sword and gun, since my story is not believeable.
 

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Lailr, don't take it personally. Regardless of the truth as you know it, there only so much someone can do to overcome someone else's chronic doubt. The way I look at it is this: You are a trustworth person until you give me reason to believe otherwise. Until that actually happens, I believe you.

Keep your chin up dude.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thanks guys
 

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Don't worry about it, lailr!  I took a black bear in the summer of 2007 over a bait station here in Alaska.  I was in a tree stand, and the sow came in from my left side.  I had my Hi-Point 4095 carbine in my lap when I saw her, so I had to ease it to my shoulder and flick off the safety as quietly as I could.  I waited until she passed under the tree stand at about ten yards away, then I let loose with six shots (overkill, probably, as she was a smaller-sized bear and the first two bullets penetrated all the way through her chest and stuck in the hide on the other side...I had my first black bear in 2001 run 1,000 yards on three legs due to an admittedly bad shot that didn't catch the vitals good...I didn't want a repeat of THAT experience, so I shot her a total of eight times...I've still got the hide to prove it, though my initial photographs got lost somehow... :'( :'( :'( ).  The sow dropped right where she stood, shuddered a couple of times, and expired within twenty seconds (thankfully, she didn't suffer for any lengthy period...I don't like doing that to any of the animals that I take...).  Just goes to show you that a .40 S&W bullet from a rifle length barrel is a force to be reckoned with...

Of course, that dang sow took me 16 hours to haul out of there... 1/4 mile from the station to the nearest road...through terrain marked by dense temperate rainforest (conifer trees, lots of moisture, thick beds of moss, etc.) and sharp, rolling hills with lots of boulder fields.  I was in there alone (probably a little stupid, in retrospect, considering how many bear were around...of course, I was loaded to the gills with ammo and guns to help compensate for my status as the sole member of a hunting expedition...), and I had to gut her out (an hour and a half), setup my backpack to carry her out (twenty minutes), tie her to a tarp and the backpack with parachute cord (another twenty minutes),  and slowly drag her out and down the mountain until I was just shy of the main path going in and out of the station.  I wrapped the carcass in the tarp and headed back to my truck (about another six hundred yards away) to catch a couple of hours of sleep since it was 4 AM and I didn't feel like trying to haul that dang bear any further in a dark forest with plenty of other predators around.  I was using a head lamp to give me some hands-free lighting as I walked out, and several times I caught glimpses of the dark masses of two bears that were following me at a distance on my back trail.  They snorted a couple of times (just to let me know that they were there, apparently...I nearly had to change my underwear a couple of times :angel: :embarrassed2: :cantlook:), and I finally took my rifle and fired a couple of rounds into the trees from the area that they were approaching.  That drove them off for awhile, and it allowed me to get to the 3/4 mark on the trail safely without any interference from the other bears.  After I set the carcass down, I took a leak in a half-moon circle about fifteen feet away from my kill so the scent would help keep the other bears off of it.  Then I walked down to my truck, drank Powerade (two quarts of the stuff!) and a quart of water, and went to sleep...

I woke up the next morning at about 8:30 AM, and proceeded to munch on some granola/chocolate bars for some quick energy along with some more water and Powerade.  I then marched back up the mountain with an eight-foot section of a stout alder that I cut for a carry pole (I didn't feel like dragging my bear any further and continuing to get debris into the chest cavity and onto the meat...plus, there was a large section of swampy grassbeds within a drainage area next to the road where I parked my truck that I had to traverse, and I didn't want to get any of that standing, pathogen-infested water into my kill (or as little of it as possible, of course).  So, I tied the front and rear paws of the sow to the ends of the pole, picked her up lengthwise (in other words, I stood in the center of the pole and picked it up with both hands to balance out the load), and headed off down the last six hundred yards to the truck.  I was weak from all of the work I had done in the last twelve hours, so it took me (quite literally) another two hours to haul that one hundred pound carcass off of that hillside (at the time, I barely topped one-twenty on the scale myself, so I was hauling a critter that was 83 1/3 % of my total weight!).  By the time I got back to the truck and hoisted that carcass into the bed of my pickup, I was exhausted. I drank 3/4 of a gallon of water in the next thirty minutes, and ate about fifteen hundred calories in the same timeframe.  Once I was rested, I finished packing up the truck and the bear, and I drove straight into the nearest town to fill up the gas tank and grab another bite to eat.  Once that was done, I drove the thirty miles back to our campsite (my family's "bear camp", or so we call it :D), and I hung the bear up in a spruce tree to let it drip and cool off. I dumped about two bags of ice into the chest cavity to assist in the process of cooling the meat, and I then cleaned up the camp a bit and headed back into town to get a nice hot meal from a local restaurant (Alaska seafood was the specialty there, so I grabbed the seafood platter...mmm...razor clams, prawns, crab meat, mussels, and halibut on a bed of fettucini noodles and sauce...I'll never forget that "victory" meal!  It was fun to celebrate all the work I had just accomplished, what can I say...).  The rest of my family was out camping on an island in the nearby bay, and a friend of ours had taken them out in his boat.  I called them on their cell phone and left a message letting them know I had taken a bear and that I was all right.  After that, a "hobo shower" (a term that basically means to use your cupped hands to splash water on your face, head, and chest with some soap, rinse, and wipe dry with a paper towel...no derogatory connotation meant to any hobos out there, of course :angel:) left me feeling refreshed, and I headed back to camp to spend the next fourteen hours asleep...boy, was that ever a trip...

Anyway, I believe you when you say you used a Hi-Point .45 ACP pistol to take on a charging bear.  The .45 ACP is not a round to belittle, and at the close ranges you are talking about, it will surely get the job done, even on a charging bear!  I'm glad you had your Hi-Point along to handle the situation, instead of having nothing more to do then just shout at the bear and hope you could get your rifle reloaded in time!  It's been said more than once, but I'll modify the quotation a bit for emphasis here to make the point:  "A Hi-Point in hand beats the Ruger .357 left at home (in your case, of course)!"

Hope this little narrative helped.  Catch y'all later!

Jag  8)
 

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Im not going to call BS The story is believable. BUT I think you coulda been unloading on him with a supersoaker instead of the JHP and been just as effective if 3 shots from a 7 mag didnt get the job done that 45 was just pissing him off worse. Glad you made it though the ordeal in one piece. I am planning on doing some bear hunting for the first time next year pretty exciting stuff.
 
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