Yurt

Discussion in 'Survival Zone' started by greg_r, Sep 14, 2014.

  1. greg_r

    greg_r Lifetime Supporter

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    Anybody have experience with a Yurt? I'm thinking I want one for a little piece of property we have. The wife thinks I have lost my mind. This property is off grid. I can get a 27' well insulated one with a 15 year warranty for about $20,000.
     
  2. ajole

    ajole Supporting Member

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    Shoot, I could get a 27 foot trailer for that! A movable yurt!:p

    Why a yurt? Why not some other type of cabin? Real question, wondering what the advantages are.
     

  3. greg_r

    greg_r Lifetime Supporter

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    I really do not know the real advantages, just went in one and liked it. Here are my thoughts.

    It's undeveloped land off the grid. Any electricity will have to be brought in. A yurt should be easier to assemble using basic hand tools. It would be cheaper to purchase and set up than a prefab cabin. A travel trailer requires a means of propulsion, my largest vehicle is a Kia Sorrento. I would have to spend another $20,000 on a truck.

    I think a Yurt would have less impact on the environment. I would just need a platform to erect it on.

    Was looking at a 16x24 cabin with a sleeping loft. I do not know if it would retain value better or not. It will be going on a small tract of land in the mountains near here. Will be a weekend getaway and hunt camp.

    Anything over 144 square feet requires a building permit and an inspection. The yurt, basically being a tent will not, or will it? I would need to check with the county.

    The cabin is $16,800. Made of pine. Has a metal roof. It is not insulated. It comes in sections that are bolted together. I could forgo the insulation on the yurt and build it considerably cheaper. The non-insulated model comes with a 10 year warranty.
     
    Last edited: Sep 14, 2014
  4. Hermitt

    Hermitt Hey! Get Off My Lawn! Member

    I work in the summer for the Idaho parks and rec. We have 3 yurts in one campground. They are kinda cool, but they do require maintenance. Last season we had to replace the dome skylights on 2 of them, 2 roof skins and one of the outer skin. This season, we have to replace another roof skin. UV really takes a toll on those vinyl skins. Also they need deterrents to keep rodents (squirrels/chipmunks, etc) from tearing out the insulation in the skins. Wasps also love to nest in any openings that they can get into..... At least you can put a wood stove and cook in them. Oh.... the skins can't be changed by yourself.....
     
  5. What did the Native Americans use in the area years ago and for what reason?

    Years ago I was interested in yurts & looked into them. I decided that they are great for nomadic shepherds, there was no practical reason for them here today. It might take a day or 2 to set up, so would have to be left on site.

    I'd build a small concrete and/or steel building that was smaller than the 144 sq ft. You might want to check into the 'tiny house movement'.

    Most people I know that have/had a cabin, ended up working on them most every weekend. Not my idea of a weekend get away.
     
  6. Hermitt

    Hermitt Hey! Get Off My Lawn! Member

    We have a neighbor down the road that only comes up for 'activities', 4 wheelers and snowmobiling mostly. He bought one of those build it yourself wooden shed kits. About a 10 x 20 or so, wired it, insulated it, a couple windows, some wallboard and a wood stove. Now he even has a satellite dish on the outside... Looks like a cozy mini cabin with virtually zero maintenance.
     
  7. I have put up a few large tipis over the years, much less expensive than a yurt. You really do not need the platform to put up a yurt or tipi. You can use a tarp and then use rugs on the floor, I believe originally rugs were used for yurts.

    But if money is the object you could buy a used trailer like Ajole suggested and have it delivered for less than a grand. Used trailers are really really inexpensive. IMO tipis is probably the safest in a wind storm, trailers roll, yurts blow down. Tipis will take considerable wind. Tipis are also much easier to set up.
     
  8. ArmyScout

    ArmyScout Supporting Member

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    You may be able to get a good a used trailer and a foundation to set it on. What about a Morton building.
     
  9. Rachgier

    Rachgier Administrator Staff Member

    The old lady and I just picked up a used pop up camper for $600. Sleeps 3-5 adults no problem, 6 if you have kids or a couple of small adults that don't mind sharing the beds. It has AC and heat, indoor stove, outdoor stove, canopy, 12v on board power with an inverter for a 110v shore line. The interior and canvas was immaculate but the exterior plastic on the trailer itself needs some body work, which I can do. Set up/break down takes less than 30 minutes from start to finish.
     
  10. greg_r

    greg_r Lifetime Supporter

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    Thanks for the info. Sounds like they are labor intensive. I expect upkeep, but I would like to be able to do most of it myself.
     
  11. greg_r

    greg_r Lifetime Supporter

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    This has entered my mind. The local home depot has a nice two story shed for just under $10, 000 They build on sight. Would not be too much to fix it up.
     
  12. greg_r

    greg_r Lifetime Supporter

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    Walkingwolf, I bet you know the area. It's located in the Brushy Mountains, off why 16, just south of the BRP. I have a pop-up I take there. Access is by an old logging road after passing through another's property I have right of way rights on. It's either 4 wheel drive or walk. My guess is at least a F-350 to get a 17 footer up there. This is probably a pipe dream anyway. I want my wife and grandkids to enjoy it with me, but it's probably a case of if you build it, they will NOT come.
     
  13. Rachgier

    Rachgier Administrator Staff Member

    Greg, when you check your local code make sure you find out if the permitting is required for permanent structures or temporary shelters. I know in NY (don't start I know NY sucks), as long as it's not permanently fixed, IE on a slab, foundation, or on piers anchored in the ground, it is considered a temporary structure and the square footage requirements for permitting are different.
     
  14. greg_r

    greg_r Lifetime Supporter

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    My only issues with New York are their oppressive laws and the NYC area. Upstate New York is beautiful.

    Good point on the permitting question though.
     
  15. I have picked up stone off of highway 16, pretty country, cold winters. Well at least colder than here in the sandhills. Getting the trailer up there would be no problem, the usual charge around here for short distance is around a thousand dollars.

    Used 12 wides can be had for around 5 grand. You would need permits and a waste treatment facility on site to pass inspection. But you would still be way under the 20 grand for a yurt. The waste treatment would probably cost more than the trailer. I can't remember if the soil there is porous enough for just a septic tank.

    Power depending on how remote the area is would be another story. If it is a long distance run that could get expensive. Might be better off with panels installed on top of the trailer.

    Forgot to mention, if you are looking for a sturdy permanent inexpensive structure look into tire homes. You most likely get the tires just for the delivery fee. They are a lot of hard work to build though. Sandbag home is less permanent but still a lot of work to build. Both are very good for storms though.
     
    Last edited: Sep 14, 2014
  16. Rachgier

    Rachgier Administrator Staff Member

    Do you still need a perk test and additional permit for a septic system?
     
  17. Ayup~but I am not sure how well the soil perks up there. Home waste treatment plants are quite expensive.
     
  18. Rachgier

    Rachgier Administrator Staff Member


    I kind of figured it hadn't changed since I left NC. I used to work as an installer for a mobile home dealer out of Pine Knoll Shores. I've done mobile homes as far west as Greensboro so I kind of know the area Greg is referring to. The perk test, permit, and entire septic system is cheaper then the treatment tank alone for the peat moss systems we used to install in the beach homes along the OBX.
     
  19. greg_r

    greg_r Lifetime Supporter

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    Power is not going to happen. The cost to clear a right of way and install the transmission lines would be prohibitive.

    Also not worried about the land perking. I'm sure it would, but plans are for a composting toilet.
     
  20. greg_r

    greg_r Lifetime Supporter

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    And then water supply. Not thinking of a well, but a rain water cistern.